What is meta? ×
Meta Stack Exchange is where users like you discuss bugs, features, and support issues that affect the software powering all 134 Stack Exchange communities.

Hi,

I just accepted an answer for this question, but then I noticed that my rep didn't change (+2). I tried un-accepting the answer and it went down two points. Looking at the answerer's graph, I see that they didn't get the two points, so it is not this problem. The two points seem to have evaporated. :-o

I take it that this is just a bug? (I considered a re-calc or something, but it would have to be a quite a coincidence that it happened in the 1.5 seconds during the reload of the page—what timing!)

share|improve this question
    
Could you have been down-voted on another post at around the same time? –  ChrisF Jan 13 '11 at 10:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You didn't earn +2 reputation for accepting it just now because you had already earned +2 reputation on that question from an earlier acceptance. According to the timeline, events went as follows.

  • Back in December 2nd, you accepted Billy O'Neal's answer. You would have gotten +2 reputation already from this.
  • On January 6th, you accepted rollo's answer. You already earned +2 reputation on this question for acceptance, so this just switches the mark with no reputation change. You then switched it back to Bily O'Neal's answer, which likewise results in no +2.
  • Today on January 13th, you switched to rollo, which as mentioned you won't earn reputation as you already earned the +2. Flipflopping, you'd see the reputation change. But on the direct change of owner as you did before, there is no observed reputation change.
share|improve this answer
    
Ah okay. Thanks. I had looked at the chart in my profile, but could not see the timeline (which I'm a little weirded out to see records every move, which is kind of disconcerting since several of those moves were obviously "drafts" and reviews of changes (eg uncheck, reload, confirm change, check). –  Synetech Jan 14 '11 at 17:53

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .