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The header line of my Stack Overflow account states that I have 62 reputation points, but when I look at the reputaton graph in my profile, it ends at 55.

Is this a bug, or am I missing something?

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2 Answers 2

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At the moment you have a reputation of 67. It is comprised of:

  • 1 initial point given to you at joining SO
  • 30 gained for an answer you gave
  • 3 * 10 gained for questions you posed
  • 3 * 2 for you accepting answers to 3 of your questions

The reputation graph does only show reputation earned through other users actions, so you do not see there the initial point and the accept rewards.

Therefore the reputation graph shows a gained reputation of 60.

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@Ralph Rickenbach - That exlains the numbers, but it's still strange that looking at the graph there is no indication what so ever that it only shows part of your points ... confusing ... –  Bascy Feb 4 '11 at 12:11

The graph only show the reputation you gained in the last days, or between start date and end date you provided(but for maximum 90 days).

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No that is not correct. The leftmost value in the graph is not 0 –  Bascy Feb 4 '11 at 12:12
    
That's exactly what I've said, the graph doesn't show all your reputation from 0 to 62, but only the reputation you acquired in the last time. After reading Ralph's answer I agree mine was not complete(I didn't knew about the accept points), but I don't think I've said something wrong. –  Adinia Feb 4 '11 at 16:17
    
@Adina - If the graph shown only the points gained in the set period, and the start value of that graph (the leftmost value) is say 25 then the value at the end of the graph is the total amount of point you have gathered all time, not just in the shown period. –  Bascy Feb 6 '11 at 19:07

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