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I couldn't find anything on MSO indicating why the tag for Transact-SQL is and not or . I can see from Could the tagging system be enhanced to support tag synonyms? that tsql became the convention, but I couldn't find an explanation anywhere.

Being only one character away from makes it harder to visually distinguish them. Is there some general policy or decision I'm unaware of? Furthermore, since Sybase put the dash between "Transact" and "SQL", the name properly has a dash in it, and "T-SQL" is the proper abbreviation for the language.

Seeing as how they're all synonyms anyway, is there a reason not to change how they're displayed?

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closed as off-topic by Fish Below the Ice, psubsee2003, Al E., ᔕᖺᘎᕊ, Infinite Recursion Jun 2 at 19:26

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It seems like most of the tags have had spaces and dashes snipped from them, even when that would dramatically improve readability. I'm not sure what the logic is for this... – Cody Gray Apr 2 '11 at 14:50
@CodyGray Actually lots of tags don't. For example, .net-4.0, sql-server-2008, entity-framework-4.1, etc. This should be looked at and changed, IMO. – Yuck Jan 11 '12 at 13:26
@Yuck The -'s here signify a space, not a dash. – Danny Beckett Mar 18 '13 at 1:38

1 Answer 1

The dashes are used for both replacing spaces as well as hyphenated terms, such as the following:

and terms hyphenated in one context but not others, such as:

So it should be applied in this case as well.

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