What is meta? ×
Meta Stack Exchange is where users like you discuss bugs, features, and support issues that affect the software powering all 134 Stack Exchange communities.

Recently I have asked the question How can I use a custom control class that inherits from a built-in control on my main form? and I am having good response from our Great community but there is a comment issued by Sanjeevakumar Hiremath is as below:

@mahesh, pick up a book on .Net Windows Forms and try reading these steps instead of leaving comment on every possible steps.

I want to ask our community and moderator too. That learning through comments Is This Sin over there?

I am waiting for answer of my question. Which is very useful in second session for me.I wants to know if some body wants to learn by comments is wrong or write or he/she stop to leave comments for further inquiry?.

share|improve this question
5  
Your focus on comments is avoiding the real issue of your questions consistently being of poor quality. –  random Apr 18 '11 at 13:29

2 Answers 2

Sanjeevakumar is saying that you're asking a bunch of really simple questions, and not only are they simple, but they are very low quality. It doesn't appear that you're spending very much time or putting very much effort into writing your questions.

His comment says that you'll have a lot better luck if you get a book that teaches you the basics of .NET Windows Forms programming, rather than trying to ask questions about each step. This is probably true; it's hard to really learn something well without a solid background, and it's hard to get this type of background from individual questions on a Q&A site.

Because of the volume of questions we get each day on Stack Overflow, we try very hard to deter users from contributing low-quality content. There are even automatic filters that kick in if it looks like you're one of those people, and your IP address can be permanently banned. However, at this point, your account has only been temporarily suspended by a moderator. This is not permanent. Instead, the hope is that you'll learn that you need to take time to ask better questions, and become a participating member of the community once again.

You can learn more about temporary and permanent account bans from the answer to this question, as well as see some tips about how to ask better quality questions.

To answer the question you actually asked here, no there is absolutely nothing wrong with learning through comments. We all do that. I myself learn new things all the time through comments. The problem is the quantity, along with the fact that you haven't shown any attempt to improve the quality of your questions over time: you can't learn everything through comments.

share|improve this answer
    
As an aside: this user is currently suspended, which is a manual action of a moderator. The automatic filtering that I am aware of, is permanent (non-expiring) until the user manages to increase their reputation by posting good quality answers (or by editing existing posts and somehow get upvotes for that). –  Arjan Apr 17 '11 at 11:10
2  
As for learning through comments: what bothers me with some users' comments is that they seem to be about different topics, not really related to the question that was asked. Using comments in that way, kind of turns the commenting into a forum. (I am not saying that this specific user also is doing this; haven't really checked.) –  Arjan Apr 17 '11 at 11:16
    
@Arjan: Yeah, I see a lot of that. I try to be as detailed and helpful as possible in my answers, and users appreciate that. The inevitable consequence is that they want me to explain the next steps to them in comments, as well. There's a very thin line between what is simple an "extension" of my answer, and what qualifies as an entirely new question. I've recently decided that I've been too nice in answering, and have started telling people to ask a new question, instead. –  Cody Gray Apr 17 '11 at 11:19

See

http://blog.stackoverflow.com/2009/04/a-day-in-the-penalty-box/

The most common suspension reason these days, by far, is this:

No effort to learn and improve over time

  • This user does not put reasonable effort into the questions they ask of the community.
  • There is little or no evidence of this user learning over time, either in the topic itself or in the community norms on the site.
  • This user intentionally spams the site with the same question or very similar questions, over and over.
  • The user never gives anything back to the community, but only takes.

So to answer your question: you haven't shown sufficient evidence to us that you are learning.

Try reading some of the following:

share|improve this answer
    
Did you checked my recently question which has upvoted more than 1 or 2 –  mahesh Apr 17 '11 at 10:15
    
If i am not trying to learn than How can I obtain upvoted recently more than 1 OR 2?. Please reply it of. –  mahesh Apr 17 '11 at 10:24
3  
@mahesh: Looking at your profile, I see a number of upvoted questions. But your newest question has one downvote. It's not sufficient to have a handful of upvoted questions, any more than it is sufficient to have only part of your rent money. Go read the links Jeff gave you, especially the vampires one. –  Robert Harvey Apr 18 '11 at 14:12

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .