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The Stack Exchange family of sites brings a lot of innovation and polish to the question-and-answer genre on the Internet. The sites are attracting true subject-matter experts to a dialog that also brings in a multitude of questions from non-experts, representing both practical ideas and disruptive innovation.

To what extent has the Stack Exchange family spawned new publishable lines of research?

For example, it appears that an answer by Thomas Pornin to my MySQL OLD_PASSWORD cryptanalysis? - IT Security question is the first cryptographic break of a very popular password hashing scheme. (Update: we found a previous publication. But still - very cool)

What other notable answers are out there, that might serve as good publicity for Stack Exchange in academic circles?

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Some of Eric Lippert's answers on StackOverflow come to mind. –  Robert Harvey Apr 18 '11 at 14:17
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Shameless self-promotion, but I have high hopes this will end up getting published :-) –  Ivo Flipse Apr 18 '11 at 17:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I can't cite any specific examples, but the two places I'd look are MathOverflow (SE 1.0) and Theoretical Computer Science. Both sites welcome only research level questions in their respective fields.

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for MathOverflow see meta.mathoverflow.net/discussion/64/… –  Grigory M Apr 18 '11 at 17:52

I expect that the answer to my question here will be published, probably this year:
Given two basis sets for a finite Hilbert space, does an unbiased vector exist?

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Do you mean that one of the arxiv citations given will be published in a peer-reviewed venue? (I don't think that counts.) Or that the actual answer will be published? –  Robin Green Apr 28 '11 at 9:51
    
I mean "accepted for publication in a peer reviewed venue", but this means it would likely be in print in the next year. And by "this year" I mean "over the next 12 months". My "peer reviewed paper" count is only three, but I've only been doing it for the last couple years. –  Carl Brannen Apr 28 '11 at 21:58

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