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I find it odd that lately I get comments that my 58% accept rate is low. I accept answers if they truly helped me. I don't feel it's right to accept highly voted (1+) answers if the answers didn't help me.

I don't mind the comments but if some users are not answering because they see a 58% rate, I am going to say that's a shame. I hope these users genuinely want to help other users and not do it for the sake of collecting points only.

I don't want to be tempted to go back to my unanswered questions and haphazardly accept answers just up my accept rate.

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I don't think so - but then I try not to pay much attention to accept rate. –  ChrisF Apr 19 '11 at 21:24
    
They're not going to answer anyway. They can't tell the difference between people who are leeches and those who are picky. –  random Apr 19 '11 at 21:27
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I'd reply but your accept rate is only 22% here. –  CanSpice Apr 19 '11 at 21:38
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The only truly bad accept rate is if you have un-accepted questions that already have a satisfying answer. –  Pëkka Apr 19 '11 at 22:24
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Is 51% too low? Is it a problem? Or is it their problem? I guess it depends on your perspective: Accept rate usefulness –  Robert Cartaino Apr 19 '11 at 22:30
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Ask good questions and nobody gives a hoot what your accept rate looks like. Why you don't get good answers on good questions is not clear from the question. It's not a very good one. –  Uphill Luge Apr 20 '11 at 0:46
    
@CanSpice Some of my questions on meta are for discussion purposes only where accepting an answer sometimes doesn't apply or make sense. –  Tony_Henrich Apr 29 '11 at 18:40
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@Tony_Henrich: Way to miss the joke. :-) –  CanSpice Apr 29 '11 at 21:07
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seriously ? only 20% of the answers to your 73 questions were helpful ? I find that hard to believe, but you know what, even if that's the case, I'd expect you to go on and put the effort in writing the answers that you've found to questions that you asked, even if it's just "for the community". The idea is to give some as well as to get. if you're except rate is so low - for me, it means that you're not into "giving"... –  alfasin Jun 29 '12 at 18:06

3 Answers 3

Why don't you go back to your questions and write answers on how you solved that problem and accept that? That way you can accept good enough (in your opinion) answer.

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No 58% isn't low, I'd say its in the middle. This isn't bad as per the faq on accept rate

If you see a middle of the road percentage, it’s an experienced user who understands what accepted answers are for.

Given the number of questions and the rate I would say you would you fall in that category. Perhaps pointing the commenter to the faq might be worthwhile

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That's what I always thought, but if that's the case, then why did they make %75+ green? –  John Apr 19 '11 at 23:41

58% looks fine to me.

Perhaps it's time to knock the accept rate on the head. Newer mechanisms for encouraging participation (like the no longer accepting questions from this account feature) strike me as more effective.

Removing them (at least to the profile page) would offer an opportunity to remove one bit of clutter from the UI and perhaps reduce the number of Improve your accept rate! comments (in terms of information about the topic, these are valueless).

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Maybe your accept rate should be visible only to you. That way, you get some indication that you're not doing something right, but people would (with any luck) not be so quick to post "improve ur accept rate" comments. (I say "ur" because it seems that's the most common phrasing, for some reason.) –  mmyers Apr 19 '11 at 22:56
    
See also meta.stackexchange.com/questions/87513/… –  mmyers Apr 19 '11 at 22:58

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