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I recently put a post up regarding how to unflag a question I had previous flagged, and this was correctly marked as a duplicate question with Flag removal: Is it possible to remove your flag or otherwise indicate it should be unflagged?

I'm not sure if this is a bug, or a feature request, but in this case I did some searching before I posted but still posted a duplicate as "Unflag" and "Unflagged" return different search results. (The post above wasn't returned when searching for Unflag). Is this correct behavior and is there any way to do a partial word search?

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Searched: +flag +remove –  random Apr 20 '11 at 1:08
    
@random I don't really see how my question is a dupe of this one - this is about stemming, while mine is about what characters serve as delimiters –  Pëkka Sep 19 '11 at 18:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well the normal way of handling this is Stemming, which (among other things) strips suffixes and reduces words down some root. For example in this case "unflagged" should really be reduced down to "unflag" by removing the "ged".

This may well aready be done for StackOverflow its just that "unflagged" is a bit of an odd case because you also need to removed the "g" as well as the "ed".

Update: The Porter stemming algorithm should handle "unflagged" perfectly.

Also from a couple of sample searches it looks like the Stack Overflow search doesn't currently use any stemming algorithm.

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We now stem! weeeeeee! –  Nick Craver Feb 4 '13 at 14:19

If you are aware that you might need a partial hit, then just use an asterisk:

http://meta.stackoverflow.com/search?q=unflag*

(I feel automatic partial searches might get me far too many results, but Kragen's stemming proposal might be nice indeed.)

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