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I'm fairly responsive to comments left on my answers. This often means updating an answer to incorporate new information or questions that have been added in the comments (or edits to the original question).

It would be useful to flag comments as 'addressed by edit', so that they can be deleted by the commentator, or highlighted for pruning by mods - I don't think this is in scope for the usual 'flag comment'.

More contentiously, it might make sense if comments flagged with 'addressed by edit' were automatically suppressed after a suitable period of time has passed - long enough to rule out silliness with duplicate comments being used to steal comment upvotes.

EDIT I'm not convinced that "This would mean that in the long run, you could delete any comments on your posts without involving others" would be a problem. It is a valid point, so the safeguard would be to have a veto, so that when a poster says 'addressed by edit' the commentator can say 'no it isn't'.

I can see there is still an argument that comments add to a SO users (offline) rep, however I believe mods clean-up posts anyway to remove comment noise, so I don't think anything is really lost.

Moving on to the concerns complicating the UI, I happily concede that a flag next to comments would be the wrong place. Presenting a list of comments plus checkbox at edit time would work, and should improve quality (as comments become prompts when editing).

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this system your propose in the edit would be readily understood by tech-types, not so much by non-techies. –  Neil Fein Apr 24 '11 at 21:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can now flag comments as "obsolete" which covers this case.

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Is it the same threshold as for spam/offensive? I just flagged a comment on this page... –  Lorem Ipsum Jun 4 '11 at 23:06
    
Flagging requires a moderator to step in. A mechanism where the workflow is solely between the commenter and editor would decrease the moderator workload. –  Edward Brey Oct 23 '13 at 16:08

The "Addressed By Edit" choice should immediately remove the comment. A commenter should be notified of the removal with an option to restore the comment.

Concerned about the editor having too much power to change someone else's work? Compare it to editing an question or answer. It's the same workflow. Someone makes a change; the change is immediately applied; the content author gets a notification to review and if necessary revert.

For users who haven't reach a reputation threshold, the "Addressed By Edit" choice should go through a moderator before the comment is removed, but otherwise, the workflow should be the same. Again, there is a direct parallel to editing questions and answers.

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I think this is unnecessary, and would complicate what is currently a fairly simple and intuitive interface.

One can leave a further comment indicating that they've addressed the issue. There's no need to add an additional feature, which would also require another mouseover icon next to the comments.

Also, comment upvotes don't confer any rep, so I don't see how it matters if they're "stolen".

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Stolen upvotes wouldn't really 'matter', but people are odd, and would try to game the system. I merely suggested a mechanism to discourage it. Leaving an extra comment to say you've addressed a comment just leads to 2 comments cancelling each other and adding no value to question or answer, where having no comments is cleaner –  Phil Lello Apr 24 '11 at 2:22
    
No rep, but there is a badge for comment upvotes. –  John Apr 24 '11 at 3:33
    
Hopefully I've addressed the UI clutter issue with my latest edit, let me know if not –  Phil Lello Apr 24 '11 at 19:40
    
@Phil - I think that presenting a list of comments at edit time would confuse new users far more than any long list of comments could. –  Neil Fein Apr 24 '11 at 21:28

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