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If I delete my answer with some up votes, do I lose the reputation? Or, if I delete an answer with down votes, is negative reputation negated?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 16 down vote accepted

In the past you would lose (or regain) all reputation due to a post being deleted, but this has changed in March 2012.

http://blog.stackoverflow.com/2012/03/reputation-and-historical-archives/

There is now an exception to the rule that votes are reversed at the time of deletion and that is to reward content of "lasting value" as follows:

First, if you’ve contributed something worthwhile to the site, you should keep the reputation for that even if it eventually gets deleted. “Worthwhile” here is defined as,

  • A score of 3 or greater
  • Visible on the site for at least 60 days

In fast-changing professions, there should be no shame in contributing valuable information just because it eventually goes out of date – and there shouldn’t be a penalty for deleting it when it does. Naturally, editing to bring an answer up-to-date is preferable – but if someone else already posted a good answer with current information, you should be able to remove yours and keep the reward for the time it was useful.

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4  
So as a case in point, @you's answer above gained reputation but is now incorrect. It could be deleted without losing the reputation that was gained. I could have edited it and replaced about every word but instead chose to answer separately. –  bmike Jul 30 '12 at 17:04
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But, BЈовић, to allow YOU to delete their own answer, first the "Accepted" checkmark must be taken away from it... –  Arjan Jul 30 '12 at 17:09
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Votes indicate popularity, which does not directly indicate valuable information. Not often, but sometimes popular answers can be wrong, harmful, or besides the point. –  Iain Elder Jan 5 at 17:34

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