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If question X is closed as a duplicate of question Y, is question Y given more weight than it would be otherwise in "related questions" when someone asks a similar question Z? (Both in the questions listed under the title when you're drafting a question, and in what appears on the right hand side of existing questions)

Background: When I came across Ruby method with argument hash with default values: how to DRY?, I thought "this had to have been asked before!", but it took me 10 minutes to find the original What's a nice clean way to use an options hash with defaults values as a parameter in ruby . Is providing a link from the former to the latter (and potentially closing the former) going to make it easier to find in future under the "related questions" section? Or should I not bother?

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If my DupLinkCount were a column alongside newest/faq/votes/active/unanswered, you'd just sort by it to see the "real, question-generated FAQ". Assiduous users would more easily find originals to link to when voting to close, and probably be motivated to make sure the originals were solid. –  FumbleFingers Aug 26 '11 at 0:27

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I don't think they particularly get more weight in the Related Questions sidebar.

However, this kind of weight does come into play elsewhere - in the faq tab under Questions. This lists, based on the tag you're browsing or in general, questions that are highly linked. As such, it catches both highly referenced questions as well as the sources of most of the major duplicates.

Thus, you should indeed bother to provide a link. It may not do all that much to stop new users from posting duplicates, but it'll help those who search for the duplicates to provide answers to said new users.

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I think maybe that faq "highly-linked" tab doesn't work on language.se. Have a look at the list, and tell me exactly what the sequence is supposed to mean. In the real world, there is no meaningful sequence there, so either it's broken or I have no idea what you mean by "highly-linked" –  FumbleFingers Aug 26 '11 at 0:23

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