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Just got my question thrown out of SO. Trying to find a loving home for it. Here it is, just for context (will delete it if it is also inappropriate here, don't sweat it :)

I'm trying to understand the concern that bitcoin's chain of blocks technique tries to solve (see http://www.bitcoin.org/bitcoin.pdf). Warning: not a crypto-dude, be tolerant.

I understand that basically we're worried about "double spending". I'm able to grasp this idea when talking about discrete, indivisible coins. E.g. there are only 3 coins in the world, which cant be divided to cents, and we need to track the history of all 3, and to make sure that each payer really had the coin he claimed to have while paying with it.

While I'm able to see how this concept extends to millions of coins, I can't get how does it extend to fractions of coins. How does a "double spending" attack scenario actually looks like? how do the honest nodes scrutinize a nominated new block, after some node proposes it as the new head node? please provide me with some illustrative examples...

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To address your parenthetical, it's actually quite appropriate to include the text of your intended question here. You won't get an answer to it, obviously, but this helps us figure out what you're actually asking, and thus gives us a better idea where the question should go in comparison to just what a vague subject line might. –  Grace Note Jul 8 '11 at 15:25
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Have you thought about Information Security? –  Won't Jul 8 '11 at 15:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This kind of question appears to be off-topic at programmers.stackexchange.com:

It might be on-topic at cstheory.stackexchange.com, though they already have one:

It looks like it might be ideal for the proposed cryptography Q&A site when it starts.

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