5 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
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And so making them the focal point for controversy on the most controversial questions on the site is somewhere between counterproductive and outright cruel. If the intention was to make these questions almost untouchable, the end result was to make each moderator into a proxy-voter for a group of users willing to repeatedly flag questions they don't like. Instead of seeing the names of their peers listed below the deleted question, those trusted users who would vote to undelete instead see one name. They may well have votedvoted for this person to moderate the site, but they didn't vote for the users who flagged - and may not even have argued publicly - for its deletion.

And so making them the focal point for controversy on the most controversial questions on the site is somewhere between counterproductive and outright cruel. If the intention was to make these questions almost untouchable, the end result was to make each moderator into a proxy-voter for a group of users willing to repeatedly flag questions they don't like. Instead of seeing the names of their peers listed below the deleted question, those trusted users who would vote to undelete instead see one name. They may well have voted for this person to moderate the site, but they didn't vote for the users who flagged - and may not even have argued publicly - for its deletion.

And so making them the focal point for controversy on the most controversial questions on the site is somewhere between counterproductive and outright cruel. If the intention was to make these questions almost untouchable, the end result was to make each moderator into a proxy-voter for a group of users willing to repeatedly flag questions they don't like. Instead of seeing the names of their peers listed below the deleted question, those trusted users who would vote to undelete instead see one name. They may well have voted for this person to moderate the site, but they didn't vote for the users who flagged - and may not even have argued publicly - for its deletion.

4 replaced http://meta.stackexchange.com/ with https://meta.stackexchange.com/
source | link

And then... We rolled out massive changes to how reputation is reportedout massive changes to how reputation is reported. In theory, this should not have been terribly disruptive - there are actually no changes to how reputation is awarded or calculated. However, changes to reputation caused by the deletion of questions and answers is now reflected almost instantly, and the source of the loss or gain indicated in each user's reputation history.

This ended up being something of a big dealsomething of a big deal.

The controversy surrounding question deletion has been around for years. Folks have argued - often successfullyoften successfully - that some questions should be harder to delete than others based on their popularity. At the same time, we've come to realize that popularity alone is a poor indicator of either quality or usefulness:

One thing that needs to change ASAP is the algorithm for calculating delete votesthe algorithm for calculating delete votes. Moderators shouldn't need to intervene except in... Exceptional circumstances. A popular but utterly pointless question. A bitter argument between factions. Vandalism. They don't need to be acting as proxies for everyone with an axe to grind, or an inability to let go of the past.

  1. Users who feel a question must be deleted - or has been deleted in error - can bring them up for discussion here on Meta. They must be tagged: discussion specific-question deleted-questionsdiscussion specific-question deleted-questions, and must remain civil and focused on the worth of the question itself. Multiple, specific discussions on the same question are disallowed.

  2. Moderators convinced by discussion of the lasting worth of a controversial question may lock it with the "historical significance" notice. At this point, it will be considered immutable - any arguments for a change to it must be raised here on Meta per #1.

  3. Moderators should largely ignore flags asking for deletion on old, popular questions. Flags are not votes, and flaggers are not necessarily trusted users. A moderator who feels strongly that such a question must be deleted should do so of his own conviction, prepared to stand and calmly defend his decision, as it cannot be overridden by voters.

  4. Users who disagree with the deletion of a question, but are unable to convince the community that it should be preserved on Stack Overflow, should copy the content of the question and answers, and re-post it off-site with attribution as mandated by the CC BY-SA license.

And then... We rolled out massive changes to how reputation is reported. In theory, this should not have been terribly disruptive - there are actually no changes to how reputation is awarded or calculated. However, changes to reputation caused by the deletion of questions and answers is now reflected almost instantly, and the source of the loss or gain indicated in each user's reputation history.

This ended up being something of a big deal.

The controversy surrounding question deletion has been around for years. Folks have argued - often successfully - that some questions should be harder to delete than others based on their popularity. At the same time, we've come to realize that popularity alone is a poor indicator of either quality or usefulness:

  • The limits placed on delete voters specifically to help preserve popular questions resulted in questions that were effectively deletable only by moderators... The end-result being, it makes more sense to flag for moderator attention than to vote.

  • Moderator-deletion was made exempt from community override. Step #10 in the Question Lifecycle involves trusted users being able to disagree with deletion and restore a question to full visibility... But now that only works if it's deleted by the community at large. If 60 trusted users delete an extremely popular question, it can still be undeleted - but if one moderator deletes the same question, the only recourse is to publicly petition for another moderator to restore it.

One thing that needs to change ASAP is the algorithm for calculating delete votes. Moderators shouldn't need to intervene except in... Exceptional circumstances. A popular but utterly pointless question. A bitter argument between factions. Vandalism. They don't need to be acting as proxies for everyone with an axe to grind, or an inability to let go of the past.

  1. Users who feel a question must be deleted - or has been deleted in error - can bring them up for discussion here on Meta. They must be tagged: discussion specific-question deleted-questions, and must remain civil and focused on the worth of the question itself. Multiple, specific discussions on the same question are disallowed.

  2. Moderators convinced by discussion of the lasting worth of a controversial question may lock it with the "historical significance" notice. At this point, it will be considered immutable - any arguments for a change to it must be raised here on Meta per #1.

  3. Moderators should largely ignore flags asking for deletion on old, popular questions. Flags are not votes, and flaggers are not necessarily trusted users. A moderator who feels strongly that such a question must be deleted should do so of his own conviction, prepared to stand and calmly defend his decision, as it cannot be overridden by voters.

  4. Users who disagree with the deletion of a question, but are unable to convince the community that it should be preserved on Stack Overflow, should copy the content of the question and answers, and re-post it off-site with attribution as mandated by the CC BY-SA license.

And then... We rolled out massive changes to how reputation is reported. In theory, this should not have been terribly disruptive - there are actually no changes to how reputation is awarded or calculated. However, changes to reputation caused by the deletion of questions and answers is now reflected almost instantly, and the source of the loss or gain indicated in each user's reputation history.

This ended up being something of a big deal.

The controversy surrounding question deletion has been around for years. Folks have argued - often successfully - that some questions should be harder to delete than others based on their popularity. At the same time, we've come to realize that popularity alone is a poor indicator of either quality or usefulness:

  • The limits placed on delete voters specifically to help preserve popular questions resulted in questions that were effectively deletable only by moderators... The end-result being, it makes more sense to flag for moderator attention than to vote.

  • Moderator-deletion was made exempt from community override. Step #10 in the Question Lifecycle involves trusted users being able to disagree with deletion and restore a question to full visibility... But now that only works if it's deleted by the community at large. If 60 trusted users delete an extremely popular question, it can still be undeleted - but if one moderator deletes the same question, the only recourse is to publicly petition for another moderator to restore it.

One thing that needs to change ASAP is the algorithm for calculating delete votes. Moderators shouldn't need to intervene except in... Exceptional circumstances. A popular but utterly pointless question. A bitter argument between factions. Vandalism. They don't need to be acting as proxies for everyone with an axe to grind, or an inability to let go of the past.

  1. Users who feel a question must be deleted - or has been deleted in error - can bring them up for discussion here on Meta. They must be tagged: discussion specific-question deleted-questions, and must remain civil and focused on the worth of the question itself. Multiple, specific discussions on the same question are disallowed.

  2. Moderators convinced by discussion of the lasting worth of a controversial question may lock it with the "historical significance" notice. At this point, it will be considered immutable - any arguments for a change to it must be raised here on Meta per #1.

  3. Moderators should largely ignore flags asking for deletion on old, popular questions. Flags are not votes, and flaggers are not necessarily trusted users. A moderator who feels strongly that such a question must be deleted should do so of his own conviction, prepared to stand and calmly defend his decision, as it cannot be overridden by voters.

  4. Users who disagree with the deletion of a question, but are unable to convince the community that it should be preserved on Stack Overflow, should copy the content of the question and answers, and re-post it off-site with attribution as mandated by the CC BY-SA license.

3 Migration of MSO links to MSE links
source | link

And then... We rolled out massive changes to how reputation is reportedout massive changes to how reputation is reported. In theory, this should not have been terribly disruptive - there are actually no changes to how reputation is awarded or calculated. However, changes to reputation caused by the deletion of questions and answers is now reflected almost instantly, and the source of the loss or gain indicated in each user's reputation history.

This ended up being something of a big dealsomething of a big deal.

The controversy surrounding question deletion has been around for years. Folks have argued - often successfullyoften successfully - that some questions should be harder to delete than others based on their popularity. At the same time, we've come to realize that popularity alone is a poor indicator of either quality or usefulness:

One thing that needs to change ASAP is the algorithm for calculating delete votesthe algorithm for calculating delete votes. Moderators shouldn't need to intervene except in... Exceptional circumstances. A popular but utterly pointless question. A bitter argument between factions. Vandalism. They don't need to be acting as proxies for everyone with an axe to grind, or an inability to let go of the past.

  1. Users who feel a question must be deleted - or has been deleted in error - can bring them up for discussion here on Meta. They must be tagged: discussion specific-question deleted-questionsdiscussion specific-question deleted-questions, and must remain civil and focused on the worth of the question itself. Multiple, specific discussions on the same question are disallowed.

  2. Moderators convinced by discussion of the lasting worth of a controversial question may lock it with the "historical significance" notice. At this point, it will be considered immutable - any arguments for a change to it must be raised here on Meta per #1.

  3. Moderators should largely ignore flags asking for deletion on old, popular questions. Flags are not votes, and flaggers are not necessarily trusted users. A moderator who feels strongly that such a question must be deleted should do so of his own conviction, prepared to stand and calmly defend his decision, as it cannot be overridden by voters.

  4. Users who disagree with the deletion of a question, but are unable to convince the community that it should be preserved on Stack Overflow, should copy the content of the question and answers, and re-post it off-site with attribution as mandated by the CC BY-SA license.

And then... We rolled out massive changes to how reputation is reported. In theory, this should not have been terribly disruptive - there are actually no changes to how reputation is awarded or calculated. However, changes to reputation caused by the deletion of questions and answers is now reflected almost instantly, and the source of the loss or gain indicated in each user's reputation history.

This ended up being something of a big deal.

The controversy surrounding question deletion has been around for years. Folks have argued - often successfully - that some questions should be harder to delete than others based on their popularity. At the same time, we've come to realize that popularity alone is a poor indicator of either quality or usefulness:

  • The limits placed on delete voters specifically to help preserve popular questions resulted in questions that were effectively deletable only by moderators... The end-result being, it makes more sense to flag for moderator attention than to vote.

  • Moderator-deletion was made exempt from community override. Step #10 in the Question Lifecycle involves trusted users being able to disagree with deletion and restore a question to full visibility... But now that only works if it's deleted by the community at large. If 60 trusted users delete an extremely popular question, it can still be undeleted - but if one moderator deletes the same question, the only recourse is to publicly petition for another moderator to restore it.

One thing that needs to change ASAP is the algorithm for calculating delete votes. Moderators shouldn't need to intervene except in... Exceptional circumstances. A popular but utterly pointless question. A bitter argument between factions. Vandalism. They don't need to be acting as proxies for everyone with an axe to grind, or an inability to let go of the past.

  1. Users who feel a question must be deleted - or has been deleted in error - can bring them up for discussion here on Meta. They must be tagged: discussion specific-question deleted-questions, and must remain civil and focused on the worth of the question itself. Multiple, specific discussions on the same question are disallowed.

  2. Moderators convinced by discussion of the lasting worth of a controversial question may lock it with the "historical significance" notice. At this point, it will be considered immutable - any arguments for a change to it must be raised here on Meta per #1.

  3. Moderators should largely ignore flags asking for deletion on old, popular questions. Flags are not votes, and flaggers are not necessarily trusted users. A moderator who feels strongly that such a question must be deleted should do so of his own conviction, prepared to stand and calmly defend his decision, as it cannot be overridden by voters.

  4. Users who disagree with the deletion of a question, but are unable to convince the community that it should be preserved on Stack Overflow, should copy the content of the question and answers, and re-post it off-site with attribution as mandated by the CC BY-SA license.

And then... We rolled out massive changes to how reputation is reported. In theory, this should not have been terribly disruptive - there are actually no changes to how reputation is awarded or calculated. However, changes to reputation caused by the deletion of questions and answers is now reflected almost instantly, and the source of the loss or gain indicated in each user's reputation history.

This ended up being something of a big deal.

The controversy surrounding question deletion has been around for years. Folks have argued - often successfully - that some questions should be harder to delete than others based on their popularity. At the same time, we've come to realize that popularity alone is a poor indicator of either quality or usefulness:

  • The limits placed on delete voters specifically to help preserve popular questions resulted in questions that were effectively deletable only by moderators... The end-result being, it makes more sense to flag for moderator attention than to vote.

  • Moderator-deletion was made exempt from community override. Step #10 in the Question Lifecycle involves trusted users being able to disagree with deletion and restore a question to full visibility... But now that only works if it's deleted by the community at large. If 60 trusted users delete an extremely popular question, it can still be undeleted - but if one moderator deletes the same question, the only recourse is to publicly petition for another moderator to restore it.

One thing that needs to change ASAP is the algorithm for calculating delete votes. Moderators shouldn't need to intervene except in... Exceptional circumstances. A popular but utterly pointless question. A bitter argument between factions. Vandalism. They don't need to be acting as proxies for everyone with an axe to grind, or an inability to let go of the past.

  1. Users who feel a question must be deleted - or has been deleted in error - can bring them up for discussion here on Meta. They must be tagged: discussion specific-question deleted-questions, and must remain civil and focused on the worth of the question itself. Multiple, specific discussions on the same question are disallowed.

  2. Moderators convinced by discussion of the lasting worth of a controversial question may lock it with the "historical significance" notice. At this point, it will be considered immutable - any arguments for a change to it must be raised here on Meta per #1.

  3. Moderators should largely ignore flags asking for deletion on old, popular questions. Flags are not votes, and flaggers are not necessarily trusted users. A moderator who feels strongly that such a question must be deleted should do so of his own conviction, prepared to stand and calmly defend his decision, as it cannot be overridden by voters.

  4. Users who disagree with the deletion of a question, but are unable to convince the community that it should be preserved on Stack Overflow, should copy the content of the question and answers, and re-post it off-site with attribution as mandated by the CC BY-SA license.

2 added 81 characters in body
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1
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