9 replaced http://english.stackexchange.com/ with https://english.stackexchange.com/
source | link

It's pretty obvious that there's a "bandwagon effect", wherein people vote up answers that already have upvotes and ignore answers that already have downvotes, so it makes sense that dishonest people would manipulate this effect by using "tactical downvoting" to push themselves to the top of the list.

But if "tactical downvoting" is really a serious problem (and it doesn't sound like it is), locking-in votes is not a solution. In fact, it's a problem of its own.

There are many topics where common understanding is subtly wrong. (You know, the sorts of questions that people ask on sites like this.) The first answers will often be flawed by this common misunderstanding, and the first upvotes that pour in will also be wrong. Only after some discussion in the commentssome discussion in the comments or after a more enlightened answer is posted do voters realize just how wrong that other answer is. But their votes are locked-in and can't be changed. The subtly-wrong answer now has lots of upvotes it doesn't deserve, continuing the cycle of misunderstanding as it misleads thousands of subsequent viewers.

Locking votes doesn't do anything to prevent people from downvoting competing answers anyway. They can still do that just fine. It does prevent them from undoing the damage after they "win", however, which just makes it even more harmful to the victims.

It does make permanent the small rep penalty you get for downvoting others, but that's not enough to stop anyone. Pushing yourself to the top of the bandwagon will get you a lot more rep than you lose. If that's really the rationale, it would be better to allow people to undo their downvotes, but don't give them their rep back when they do. Same effect on the voter, without the harmful side effects.

A real solution would be to remove the bandwagon effect altogether. Two proposals:

  1. For a period of time after a question is asked, display the answers in random order and hide the number of votes they've received. Downvoting competing answers will accomplish nothing, since no one can see the current score and be influenced by it. Votes will be more accurate and objective, too, since people will actually have to read through answers and judge them on their merits, instead of just skimming through the ones that were posted first and ignoring the ones at the bottom.
  2. On each page view, choose at random one of the answers that haven't received many votes, and highlight it by placing it near the top of the list (maybe directly under the top-voted answer with a box around it to set it apart?) This way, in the long run, all answers will get equal exposure and hopefully more votes, to more accurately order the answers by helpfulness and counteract the "first post effect".

It's pretty obvious that there's a "bandwagon effect", wherein people vote up answers that already have upvotes and ignore answers that already have downvotes, so it makes sense that dishonest people would manipulate this effect by using "tactical downvoting" to push themselves to the top of the list.

But if "tactical downvoting" is really a serious problem (and it doesn't sound like it is), locking-in votes is not a solution. In fact, it's a problem of its own.

There are many topics where common understanding is subtly wrong. (You know, the sorts of questions that people ask on sites like this.) The first answers will often be flawed by this common misunderstanding, and the first upvotes that pour in will also be wrong. Only after some discussion in the comments or after a more enlightened answer is posted do voters realize just how wrong that other answer is. But their votes are locked-in and can't be changed. The subtly-wrong answer now has lots of upvotes it doesn't deserve, continuing the cycle of misunderstanding as it misleads thousands of subsequent viewers.

Locking votes doesn't do anything to prevent people from downvoting competing answers anyway. They can still do that just fine. It does prevent them from undoing the damage after they "win", however, which just makes it even more harmful to the victims.

It does make permanent the small rep penalty you get for downvoting others, but that's not enough to stop anyone. Pushing yourself to the top of the bandwagon will get you a lot more rep than you lose. If that's really the rationale, it would be better to allow people to undo their downvotes, but don't give them their rep back when they do. Same effect on the voter, without the harmful side effects.

A real solution would be to remove the bandwagon effect altogether. Two proposals:

  1. For a period of time after a question is asked, display the answers in random order and hide the number of votes they've received. Downvoting competing answers will accomplish nothing, since no one can see the current score and be influenced by it. Votes will be more accurate and objective, too, since people will actually have to read through answers and judge them on their merits, instead of just skimming through the ones that were posted first and ignoring the ones at the bottom.
  2. On each page view, choose at random one of the answers that haven't received many votes, and highlight it by placing it near the top of the list (maybe directly under the top-voted answer with a box around it to set it apart?) This way, in the long run, all answers will get equal exposure and hopefully more votes, to more accurately order the answers by helpfulness and counteract the "first post effect".

It's pretty obvious that there's a "bandwagon effect", wherein people vote up answers that already have upvotes and ignore answers that already have downvotes, so it makes sense that dishonest people would manipulate this effect by using "tactical downvoting" to push themselves to the top of the list.

But if "tactical downvoting" is really a serious problem (and it doesn't sound like it is), locking-in votes is not a solution. In fact, it's a problem of its own.

There are many topics where common understanding is subtly wrong. (You know, the sorts of questions that people ask on sites like this.) The first answers will often be flawed by this common misunderstanding, and the first upvotes that pour in will also be wrong. Only after some discussion in the comments or after a more enlightened answer is posted do voters realize just how wrong that other answer is. But their votes are locked-in and can't be changed. The subtly-wrong answer now has lots of upvotes it doesn't deserve, continuing the cycle of misunderstanding as it misleads thousands of subsequent viewers.

Locking votes doesn't do anything to prevent people from downvoting competing answers anyway. They can still do that just fine. It does prevent them from undoing the damage after they "win", however, which just makes it even more harmful to the victims.

It does make permanent the small rep penalty you get for downvoting others, but that's not enough to stop anyone. Pushing yourself to the top of the bandwagon will get you a lot more rep than you lose. If that's really the rationale, it would be better to allow people to undo their downvotes, but don't give them their rep back when they do. Same effect on the voter, without the harmful side effects.

A real solution would be to remove the bandwagon effect altogether. Two proposals:

  1. For a period of time after a question is asked, display the answers in random order and hide the number of votes they've received. Downvoting competing answers will accomplish nothing, since no one can see the current score and be influenced by it. Votes will be more accurate and objective, too, since people will actually have to read through answers and judge them on their merits, instead of just skimming through the ones that were posted first and ignoring the ones at the bottom.
  2. On each page view, choose at random one of the answers that haven't received many votes, and highlight it by placing it near the top of the list (maybe directly under the top-voted answer with a box around it to set it apart?) This way, in the long run, all answers will get equal exposure and hopefully more votes, to more accurately order the answers by helpfulness and counteract the "first post effect".
8 replaced http://meta.stackexchange.com/ with https://meta.stackexchange.com/
source | link

It's pretty obvious that there's a "bandwagon effect", wherein people vote up answers that already have upvotes and ignore answers that already have downvotes, so it makes sense that dishonest people would manipulate this effect by using "tactical downvoting" to push themselves to the top of the list.

But if "tactical downvoting" is really a serious problem (and it doesn't sound like it isit doesn't sound like it is), locking-in votes is not a solution. In fact, it's a problem of its own.

There are many topics where common understanding is subtly wrong. (You know, the sorts of questions that people ask on sites like this.) The first answers will often be flawed by this common misunderstanding, and the first upvotes that pour in will also be wrong. Only after some discussion in the comments or after a more enlightened answer is posted do voters realize just how wrong that other answer is. But their votes are locked-in and can't be changed. The subtly-wrong answer now has lots of upvotes it doesn't deserve, continuing the cycle of misunderstanding as it misleads thousands of subsequent viewers.

Locking votes doesn't do anything to prevent people from downvoting competing answers anyway. They can still do that just fine. It does prevent them from undoing the damage after they "win", however, which just makes it even more harmful to the victims.

It does make permanent the small rep penalty you get for downvoting others, but that's not enough to stop anyone. Pushing yourself to the top of the bandwagon will get you a lot more rep than you lose. If that's really the rationale, it would be better to allow people to undo their downvotes, but don't give them their rep back when they dodon't give them their rep back when they do. Same effect on the voter, without the harmful side effects.

A real solution would be to remove the bandwagon effect altogether. Two proposals:

  1. For a period of time after a question is asked, display the answers in random order and hide the number of votes they've received. Downvoting competing answers will accomplish nothing, since no one can see the current score and be influenced by it. Votes will be more accurate and objective, too, since people will actually have to read through answers and judge them on their merits, instead of just skimming through the ones that were posted first and ignoring the ones at the bottom.
  2. On each page view, choose at random one of the answers that haven't received many votes, and highlight it by placing it near the top of the list (maybe directly under the top-voted answer with a box around it to set it apart?) This way, in the long run, all answers will get equal exposure and hopefully more votes, to more accurately order the answers by helpfulness and counteract the "first post effect".

It's pretty obvious that there's a "bandwagon effect", wherein people vote up answers that already have upvotes and ignore answers that already have downvotes, so it makes sense that dishonest people would manipulate this effect by using "tactical downvoting" to push themselves to the top of the list.

But if "tactical downvoting" is really a serious problem (and it doesn't sound like it is), locking-in votes is not a solution. In fact, it's a problem of its own.

There are many topics where common understanding is subtly wrong. (You know, the sorts of questions that people ask on sites like this.) The first answers will often be flawed by this common misunderstanding, and the first upvotes that pour in will also be wrong. Only after some discussion in the comments or after a more enlightened answer is posted do voters realize just how wrong that other answer is. But their votes are locked-in and can't be changed. The subtly-wrong answer now has lots of upvotes it doesn't deserve, continuing the cycle of misunderstanding as it misleads thousands of subsequent viewers.

Locking votes doesn't do anything to prevent people from downvoting competing answers anyway. They can still do that just fine. It does prevent them from undoing the damage after they "win", however, which just makes it even more harmful to the victims.

It does make permanent the small rep penalty you get for downvoting others, but that's not enough to stop anyone. Pushing yourself to the top of the bandwagon will get you a lot more rep than you lose. If that's really the rationale, it would be better to allow people to undo their downvotes, but don't give them their rep back when they do. Same effect on the voter, without the harmful side effects.

A real solution would be to remove the bandwagon effect altogether. Two proposals:

  1. For a period of time after a question is asked, display the answers in random order and hide the number of votes they've received. Downvoting competing answers will accomplish nothing, since no one can see the current score and be influenced by it. Votes will be more accurate and objective, too, since people will actually have to read through answers and judge them on their merits, instead of just skimming through the ones that were posted first and ignoring the ones at the bottom.
  2. On each page view, choose at random one of the answers that haven't received many votes, and highlight it by placing it near the top of the list (maybe directly under the top-voted answer with a box around it to set it apart?) This way, in the long run, all answers will get equal exposure and hopefully more votes, to more accurately order the answers by helpfulness and counteract the "first post effect".

It's pretty obvious that there's a "bandwagon effect", wherein people vote up answers that already have upvotes and ignore answers that already have downvotes, so it makes sense that dishonest people would manipulate this effect by using "tactical downvoting" to push themselves to the top of the list.

But if "tactical downvoting" is really a serious problem (and it doesn't sound like it is), locking-in votes is not a solution. In fact, it's a problem of its own.

There are many topics where common understanding is subtly wrong. (You know, the sorts of questions that people ask on sites like this.) The first answers will often be flawed by this common misunderstanding, and the first upvotes that pour in will also be wrong. Only after some discussion in the comments or after a more enlightened answer is posted do voters realize just how wrong that other answer is. But their votes are locked-in and can't be changed. The subtly-wrong answer now has lots of upvotes it doesn't deserve, continuing the cycle of misunderstanding as it misleads thousands of subsequent viewers.

Locking votes doesn't do anything to prevent people from downvoting competing answers anyway. They can still do that just fine. It does prevent them from undoing the damage after they "win", however, which just makes it even more harmful to the victims.

It does make permanent the small rep penalty you get for downvoting others, but that's not enough to stop anyone. Pushing yourself to the top of the bandwagon will get you a lot more rep than you lose. If that's really the rationale, it would be better to allow people to undo their downvotes, but don't give them their rep back when they do. Same effect on the voter, without the harmful side effects.

A real solution would be to remove the bandwagon effect altogether. Two proposals:

  1. For a period of time after a question is asked, display the answers in random order and hide the number of votes they've received. Downvoting competing answers will accomplish nothing, since no one can see the current score and be influenced by it. Votes will be more accurate and objective, too, since people will actually have to read through answers and judge them on their merits, instead of just skimming through the ones that were posted first and ignoring the ones at the bottom.
  2. On each page view, choose at random one of the answers that haven't received many votes, and highlight it by placing it near the top of the list (maybe directly under the top-voted answer with a box around it to set it apart?) This way, in the long run, all answers will get equal exposure and hopefully more votes, to more accurately order the answers by helpfulness and counteract the "first post effect".
7 deleted 28 characters in body
source | link

It's pretty obvious that there's a "bandwagon effect", wherein people vote up answers that already have upvotes and ignore answers that already have downvotes, so it makes sense that dishonest people would manipulate this effect by using "tactical downvoting" to push themselves to the top of the list.

But if "tactical downvoting" is really a serious problem (and it doesn't sound like it is), locking-in votes is not a solution. In fact, it's a problem of its own.

There are many topics where common understanding is subtly wrong. (You know, the sorts of questions that people ask on sites like this.) The first answers will often be flawed by this common misunderstanding, and the first upvotes that pour in will also be wrong. Only after some discussion in the comments or after a more enlightened answer is posted do voters realize just how wrong that other answer is. But their votes are locked-in and can't be changed. The subtly-wrong answer now has lots of upvotes it doesn't deserve, continuing the cycle of misunderstanding as it misleads thousands of subsequent viewers.

Locking votes doesn't do anything to prevent people from downvoting competing answers anyway. They can still do that just fine. It does prevent them from undoing the damage after they "win", however, which just makes it even more harmful to the victims.

It does make permanent the small rep penalty you get for downvoting others, but that's not enough to stop anyone. Pushing yourself to the top of the bandwagon will get you a lot more rep than you lose. If that's really the rationale, it would be better to allow people to undo their downvotes, but don't give them their rep back when they do. Same effect on the voter, without the harmful side effects.

A real solution would be to remove the bandwagon effect altogether. Two proposals:

  1. For a period of time after a question is asked, display the answers in random order and hide the number of votes they've received. Downvoting competing answers will accomplish nothing, since no one can see the current score and be influenced by it. Votes will be more accurate and objective, too, since people will actually have to read through answers and judge them on their merits, instead of just skimming through the ones that were posted first and ignoring the ones at the bottom.
  2. On each page view, choose at random one of the answers near the bottom of the page that haven't received many votes, and highlight it by placing it near the top of the list (maybe directly under the top-voted answer with a box around it to set it apart?) This way, in the long run, all answers will get equal exposure and hopefully more votes, to more accurately order the answers by helpfulness and counteract the "first post effect".

It's pretty obvious that there's a "bandwagon effect", wherein people vote up answers that already have upvotes and ignore answers that already have downvotes, so it makes sense that dishonest people would manipulate this effect by using "tactical downvoting" to push themselves to the top of the list.

But if "tactical downvoting" is really a serious problem (and it doesn't sound like it is), locking-in votes is not a solution. In fact, it's a problem of its own.

There are many topics where common understanding is subtly wrong. (You know, the sorts of questions that people ask on sites like this.) The first answers will often be flawed by this common misunderstanding, and the first upvotes that pour in will also be wrong. Only after some discussion in the comments or after a more enlightened answer is posted do voters realize just how wrong that other answer is. But their votes are locked-in and can't be changed. The subtly-wrong answer now has lots of upvotes it doesn't deserve, continuing the cycle of misunderstanding as it misleads thousands of subsequent viewers.

Locking votes doesn't do anything to prevent people from downvoting competing answers anyway. They can still do that just fine. It does prevent them from undoing the damage after they "win", however, which just makes it even more harmful to the victims.

It does make permanent the small rep penalty you get for downvoting others, but that's not enough to stop anyone. Pushing yourself to the top of the bandwagon will get you a lot more rep than you lose. If that's really the rationale, it would be better to allow people to undo their downvotes, but don't give them their rep back when they do. Same effect on the voter, without the harmful side effects.

A real solution would be to remove the bandwagon effect altogether. Two proposals:

  1. For a period of time after a question is asked, display the answers in random order and hide the number of votes they've received. Downvoting competing answers will accomplish nothing, since no one can see the current score and be influenced by it. Votes will be more accurate and objective, too, since people will actually have to read through answers and judge them on their merits, instead of just skimming through the ones that were posted first and ignoring the ones at the bottom.
  2. On each page view, choose at random one of the answers near the bottom of the page that haven't received many votes, and highlight it by placing it near the top of the list (maybe directly under the top-voted answer with a box around it to set it apart?) This way, in the long run, all answers will get equal exposure and hopefully more votes, to more accurately order the answers by helpfulness and counteract the "first post effect".

It's pretty obvious that there's a "bandwagon effect", wherein people vote up answers that already have upvotes and ignore answers that already have downvotes, so it makes sense that dishonest people would manipulate this effect by using "tactical downvoting" to push themselves to the top of the list.

But if "tactical downvoting" is really a serious problem (and it doesn't sound like it is), locking-in votes is not a solution. In fact, it's a problem of its own.

There are many topics where common understanding is subtly wrong. (You know, the sorts of questions that people ask on sites like this.) The first answers will often be flawed by this common misunderstanding, and the first upvotes that pour in will also be wrong. Only after some discussion in the comments or after a more enlightened answer is posted do voters realize just how wrong that other answer is. But their votes are locked-in and can't be changed. The subtly-wrong answer now has lots of upvotes it doesn't deserve, continuing the cycle of misunderstanding as it misleads thousands of subsequent viewers.

Locking votes doesn't do anything to prevent people from downvoting competing answers anyway. They can still do that just fine. It does prevent them from undoing the damage after they "win", however, which just makes it even more harmful to the victims.

It does make permanent the small rep penalty you get for downvoting others, but that's not enough to stop anyone. Pushing yourself to the top of the bandwagon will get you a lot more rep than you lose. If that's really the rationale, it would be better to allow people to undo their downvotes, but don't give them their rep back when they do. Same effect on the voter, without the harmful side effects.

A real solution would be to remove the bandwagon effect altogether. Two proposals:

  1. For a period of time after a question is asked, display the answers in random order and hide the number of votes they've received. Downvoting competing answers will accomplish nothing, since no one can see the current score and be influenced by it. Votes will be more accurate and objective, too, since people will actually have to read through answers and judge them on their merits, instead of just skimming through the ones that were posted first and ignoring the ones at the bottom.
  2. On each page view, choose at random one of the answers that haven't received many votes, and highlight it by placing it near the top of the list (maybe directly under the top-voted answer with a box around it to set it apart?) This way, in the long run, all answers will get equal exposure and hopefully more votes, to more accurately order the answers by helpfulness and counteract the "first post effect".
6 Migration of MSO links to MSE links
source | link
5 add another proposal
source | link
4 added 4 characters in body
source | link
3 an example
source | link
2 added 58 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link