4 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
source | link

The answer to this question seems very clear to me:

From Jeff Atwood's comment:

If the question wouldn't be allowed on SO as it stands -- and these clearly wouldn't -- there's no way a self-answer should make it immune to the regular standards we have for all incoming questions...

Let's treat these questions just like any other question. As a community, we need to train ourselves to hold these questions to the same standard we would any other question.

In fact, the community can -- and has -- stepped up to help fix these problems when they're encountered.

For instance, recently someone asked http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11070700/how-can-i-style-a-part-of-a-single-character-with-overlays-using-a-dynamic-widthHow can I style a part of a single character with overlays using a dynamic width? because he found the answer on his own and thought it would be great to document the solution on StackOverflow. Understandably, the question was closed as Not a Real Question. Here is the original revision before 5 or 6 people all collabratively edited the post and reopened it:

The Question:

I wanted to ask the following question:

Can i style just a part of a single HTML character? For example an "X" which is half-way red and then black?

While playing around with a demo fiddle, i figured it out myself and wanted to share my solution. It's really simple.

By the way, my intention was styling the Font Awesome [icon-star][1], so that i have an exact visualization of scores.

In the question, the op states his intention to answer his question. He broke the 4th wall!

When Jeff says "pretend you're on Jeopardy" what he really means to say is that we must ask our question as if we were the person experiencing the real, actual problem being faced. Then answer it separately, as if we were another person. In other words, pretend you're an actor on a stage playing the role of someone with a problem. Just like a professional actor, you must stay in character.

Self Answerer's Must Role Play:

For example, when self-answering, it's helpful to think of yourself as two people: jmort253(1) and jmort253(2). jmort253(1) has the question and posts it, including what problem he faced, what research he did, what alternatives he considered, and example code, if applicable. jmort253(1) should write the question from the perspective of someone who is having a problem and who simply cannot find the solution. In fact, in his role, he knows of no answer.

jmort253(2) on the other hand, sees the predicament jmort253(1) is in and answers the question, following all of the guidelines of "How to Answer", including real code and explanations and maybe supplementing the answer with a link.

Additionally, a third party coming to this page should not know that the question was self-answered. Imagine if usernames were hidden on all posts and everything was posted by Anonymous. There should be nothing in either question or answer that suggests it's self-answered or that something is amiss.

This is the true meaning of "pretend you're on Jeopardy".

The answer to this question seems very clear to me:

From Jeff Atwood's comment:

If the question wouldn't be allowed on SO as it stands -- and these clearly wouldn't -- there's no way a self-answer should make it immune to the regular standards we have for all incoming questions...

Let's treat these questions just like any other question. As a community, we need to train ourselves to hold these questions to the same standard we would any other question.

In fact, the community can -- and has -- stepped up to help fix these problems when they're encountered.

For instance, recently someone asked http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11070700/how-can-i-style-a-part-of-a-single-character-with-overlays-using-a-dynamic-width because he found the answer on his own and thought it would be great to document the solution on StackOverflow. Understandably, the question was closed as Not a Real Question. Here is the original revision before 5 or 6 people all collabratively edited the post and reopened it:

The Question:

I wanted to ask the following question:

Can i style just a part of a single HTML character? For example an "X" which is half-way red and then black?

While playing around with a demo fiddle, i figured it out myself and wanted to share my solution. It's really simple.

By the way, my intention was styling the Font Awesome [icon-star][1], so that i have an exact visualization of scores.

In the question, the op states his intention to answer his question. He broke the 4th wall!

When Jeff says "pretend you're on Jeopardy" what he really means to say is that we must ask our question as if we were the person experiencing the real, actual problem being faced. Then answer it separately, as if we were another person. In other words, pretend you're an actor on a stage playing the role of someone with a problem. Just like a professional actor, you must stay in character.

Self Answerer's Must Role Play:

For example, when self-answering, it's helpful to think of yourself as two people: jmort253(1) and jmort253(2). jmort253(1) has the question and posts it, including what problem he faced, what research he did, what alternatives he considered, and example code, if applicable. jmort253(1) should write the question from the perspective of someone who is having a problem and who simply cannot find the solution. In fact, in his role, he knows of no answer.

jmort253(2) on the other hand, sees the predicament jmort253(1) is in and answers the question, following all of the guidelines of "How to Answer", including real code and explanations and maybe supplementing the answer with a link.

Additionally, a third party coming to this page should not know that the question was self-answered. Imagine if usernames were hidden on all posts and everything was posted by Anonymous. There should be nothing in either question or answer that suggests it's self-answered or that something is amiss.

This is the true meaning of "pretend you're on Jeopardy".

The answer to this question seems very clear to me:

From Jeff Atwood's comment:

If the question wouldn't be allowed on SO as it stands -- and these clearly wouldn't -- there's no way a self-answer should make it immune to the regular standards we have for all incoming questions...

Let's treat these questions just like any other question. As a community, we need to train ourselves to hold these questions to the same standard we would any other question.

In fact, the community can -- and has -- stepped up to help fix these problems when they're encountered.

For instance, recently someone asked How can I style a part of a single character with overlays using a dynamic width? because he found the answer on his own and thought it would be great to document the solution on StackOverflow. Understandably, the question was closed as Not a Real Question. Here is the original revision before 5 or 6 people all collabratively edited the post and reopened it:

The Question:

I wanted to ask the following question:

Can i style just a part of a single HTML character? For example an "X" which is half-way red and then black?

While playing around with a demo fiddle, i figured it out myself and wanted to share my solution. It's really simple.

By the way, my intention was styling the Font Awesome [icon-star][1], so that i have an exact visualization of scores.

In the question, the op states his intention to answer his question. He broke the 4th wall!

When Jeff says "pretend you're on Jeopardy" what he really means to say is that we must ask our question as if we were the person experiencing the real, actual problem being faced. Then answer it separately, as if we were another person. In other words, pretend you're an actor on a stage playing the role of someone with a problem. Just like a professional actor, you must stay in character.

Self Answerer's Must Role Play:

For example, when self-answering, it's helpful to think of yourself as two people: jmort253(1) and jmort253(2). jmort253(1) has the question and posts it, including what problem he faced, what research he did, what alternatives he considered, and example code, if applicable. jmort253(1) should write the question from the perspective of someone who is having a problem and who simply cannot find the solution. In fact, in his role, he knows of no answer.

jmort253(2) on the other hand, sees the predicament jmort253(1) is in and answers the question, following all of the guidelines of "How to Answer", including real code and explanations and maybe supplementing the answer with a link.

Additionally, a third party coming to this page should not know that the question was self-answered. Imagine if usernames were hidden on all posts and everything was posted by Anonymous. There should be nothing in either question or answer that suggests it's self-answered or that something is amiss.

This is the true meaning of "pretend you're on Jeopardy".

3 replaced http://meta.stackexchange.com/ with https://meta.stackexchange.com/
source | link

The answer to this question seems very clear to me:

From Jeff Atwood's commentFrom Jeff Atwood's comment:

If the question wouldn't be allowed on SO as it stands -- and these clearly wouldn't -- there's no way a self-answer should make it immune to the regular standards we have for all incoming questions...

Let's treat these questions just like any other question. As a community, we need to train ourselves to hold these questions to the same standard we would any other question.

In fact, the community can -- and has -- stepped up to help fix these problems when they're encountered.

For instance, recently someone asked http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11070700/how-can-i-style-a-part-of-a-single-character-with-overlays-using-a-dynamic-width because he found the answer on his own and thought it would be great to document the solution on StackOverflow. Understandably, the question was closed as Not a Real Question. Here is the original revision before 5 or 6 people all collabratively edited the post and reopened it5 or 6 people all collabratively edited the post and reopened it:

The Question:

I wanted to ask the following question:

Can i style just a part of a single HTML character? For example an "X" which is half-way red and then black?

While playing around with a demo fiddle, i figured it out myself and wanted to share my solution. It's really simple.

By the way, my intention was styling the Font Awesome [icon-star][1], so that i have an exact visualization of scores.

In the question, the op states his intention to answer his question. He broke the 4th wall!

When Jeff says "pretend you're on Jeopardy" what he really means to say is that we must ask our question as if we were the person experiencing the real, actual problem being faced. Then answer it separately, as if we were another person. In other words, pretend you're an actor on a stage playing the role of someone with a problem. Just like a professional actor, you must stay in character.

Self Answerer's Must Role Play:

For example, when self-answering, it's helpful to think of yourself as two people: jmort253(1) and jmort253(2). jmort253(1) has the question and posts it, including what problem he faced, what research he did, what alternatives he considered, and example code, if applicable. jmort253(1) should write the question from the perspective of someone who is having a problem and who simply cannot find the solution. In fact, in his role, he knows of no answer.

jmort253(2) on the other hand, sees the predicament jmort253(1) is in and answers the question, following all of the guidelines of "How to Answer", including real code and explanations and maybe supplementing the answer with a link.

Additionally, a third party coming to this page should not know that the question was self-answered. Imagine if usernames were hidden on all posts and everything was posted by Anonymous. There should be nothing in either question or answer that suggests it's self-answered or that something is amiss.

This is the true meaning of "pretend you're on Jeopardy".

The answer to this question seems very clear to me:

From Jeff Atwood's comment:

If the question wouldn't be allowed on SO as it stands -- and these clearly wouldn't -- there's no way a self-answer should make it immune to the regular standards we have for all incoming questions...

Let's treat these questions just like any other question. As a community, we need to train ourselves to hold these questions to the same standard we would any other question.

In fact, the community can -- and has -- stepped up to help fix these problems when they're encountered.

For instance, recently someone asked http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11070700/how-can-i-style-a-part-of-a-single-character-with-overlays-using-a-dynamic-width because he found the answer on his own and thought it would be great to document the solution on StackOverflow. Understandably, the question was closed as Not a Real Question. Here is the original revision before 5 or 6 people all collabratively edited the post and reopened it:

The Question:

I wanted to ask the following question:

Can i style just a part of a single HTML character? For example an "X" which is half-way red and then black?

While playing around with a demo fiddle, i figured it out myself and wanted to share my solution. It's really simple.

By the way, my intention was styling the Font Awesome [icon-star][1], so that i have an exact visualization of scores.

In the question, the op states his intention to answer his question. He broke the 4th wall!

When Jeff says "pretend you're on Jeopardy" what he really means to say is that we must ask our question as if we were the person experiencing the real, actual problem being faced. Then answer it separately, as if we were another person. In other words, pretend you're an actor on a stage playing the role of someone with a problem. Just like a professional actor, you must stay in character.

Self Answerer's Must Role Play:

For example, when self-answering, it's helpful to think of yourself as two people: jmort253(1) and jmort253(2). jmort253(1) has the question and posts it, including what problem he faced, what research he did, what alternatives he considered, and example code, if applicable. jmort253(1) should write the question from the perspective of someone who is having a problem and who simply cannot find the solution. In fact, in his role, he knows of no answer.

jmort253(2) on the other hand, sees the predicament jmort253(1) is in and answers the question, following all of the guidelines of "How to Answer", including real code and explanations and maybe supplementing the answer with a link.

Additionally, a third party coming to this page should not know that the question was self-answered. Imagine if usernames were hidden on all posts and everything was posted by Anonymous. There should be nothing in either question or answer that suggests it's self-answered or that something is amiss.

This is the true meaning of "pretend you're on Jeopardy".

The answer to this question seems very clear to me:

From Jeff Atwood's comment:

If the question wouldn't be allowed on SO as it stands -- and these clearly wouldn't -- there's no way a self-answer should make it immune to the regular standards we have for all incoming questions...

Let's treat these questions just like any other question. As a community, we need to train ourselves to hold these questions to the same standard we would any other question.

In fact, the community can -- and has -- stepped up to help fix these problems when they're encountered.

For instance, recently someone asked http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11070700/how-can-i-style-a-part-of-a-single-character-with-overlays-using-a-dynamic-width because he found the answer on his own and thought it would be great to document the solution on StackOverflow. Understandably, the question was closed as Not a Real Question. Here is the original revision before 5 or 6 people all collabratively edited the post and reopened it:

The Question:

I wanted to ask the following question:

Can i style just a part of a single HTML character? For example an "X" which is half-way red and then black?

While playing around with a demo fiddle, i figured it out myself and wanted to share my solution. It's really simple.

By the way, my intention was styling the Font Awesome [icon-star][1], so that i have an exact visualization of scores.

In the question, the op states his intention to answer his question. He broke the 4th wall!

When Jeff says "pretend you're on Jeopardy" what he really means to say is that we must ask our question as if we were the person experiencing the real, actual problem being faced. Then answer it separately, as if we were another person. In other words, pretend you're an actor on a stage playing the role of someone with a problem. Just like a professional actor, you must stay in character.

Self Answerer's Must Role Play:

For example, when self-answering, it's helpful to think of yourself as two people: jmort253(1) and jmort253(2). jmort253(1) has the question and posts it, including what problem he faced, what research he did, what alternatives he considered, and example code, if applicable. jmort253(1) should write the question from the perspective of someone who is having a problem and who simply cannot find the solution. In fact, in his role, he knows of no answer.

jmort253(2) on the other hand, sees the predicament jmort253(1) is in and answers the question, following all of the guidelines of "How to Answer", including real code and explanations and maybe supplementing the answer with a link.

Additionally, a third party coming to this page should not know that the question was self-answered. Imagine if usernames were hidden on all posts and everything was posted by Anonymous. There should be nothing in either question or answer that suggests it's self-answered or that something is amiss.

This is the true meaning of "pretend you're on Jeopardy".

2 Migration of MSO links to MSE links
source | link

The answer to this question seems very clear to me:

From Jeff Atwood's commentFrom Jeff Atwood's comment:

If the question wouldn't be allowed on SO as it stands -- and these clearly wouldn't -- there's no way a self-answer should make it immune to the regular standards we have for all incoming questions...

Let's treat these questions just like any other question. As a community, we need to train ourselves to hold these questions to the same standard we would any other question.

In fact, the community can -- and has -- stepped up to help fix these problems when they're encountered.

For instance, recently someone asked http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11070700/how-can-i-style-a-part-of-a-single-character-with-overlays-using-a-dynamic-width because he found the answer on his own and thought it would be great to document the solution on StackOverflow. Understandably, the question was closed as Not a Real Question. Here is the original revision before 5 or 6 people all collabratively edited the post and reopened it5 or 6 people all collabratively edited the post and reopened it:

The Question:

I wanted to ask the following question:

Can i style just a part of a single HTML character? For example an "X" which is half-way red and then black?

While playing around with a demo fiddle, i figured it out myself and wanted to share my solution. It's really simple.

By the way, my intention was styling the Font Awesome [icon-star][1], so that i have an exact visualization of scores.

In the question, the op states his intention to answer his question. He broke the 4th wall!

When Jeff says "pretend you're on Jeopardy" what he really means to say is that we must ask our question as if we were the person experiencing the real, actual problem being faced. Then answer it separately, as if we were another person. In other words, pretend you're an actor on a stage playing the role of someone with a problem. Just like a professional actor, you must stay in character.

Self Answerer's Must Role Play:

For example, when self-answering, it's helpful to think of yourself as two people: jmort253(1) and jmort253(2). jmort253(1) has the question and posts it, including what problem he faced, what research he did, what alternatives he considered, and example code, if applicable. jmort253(1) should write the question from the perspective of someone who is having a problem and who simply cannot find the solution. In fact, in his role, he knows of no answer.

jmort253(2) on the other hand, sees the predicament jmort253(1) is in and answers the question, following all of the guidelines of "How to Answer", including real code and explanations and maybe supplementing the answer with a link.

Additionally, a third party coming to this page should not know that the question was self-answered. Imagine if usernames were hidden on all posts and everything was posted by Anonymous. There should be nothing in either question or answer that suggests it's self-answered or that something is amiss.

This is the true meaning of "pretend you're on Jeopardy".

The answer to this question seems very clear to me:

From Jeff Atwood's comment:

If the question wouldn't be allowed on SO as it stands -- and these clearly wouldn't -- there's no way a self-answer should make it immune to the regular standards we have for all incoming questions...

Let's treat these questions just like any other question. As a community, we need to train ourselves to hold these questions to the same standard we would any other question.

In fact, the community can -- and has -- stepped up to help fix these problems when they're encountered.

For instance, recently someone asked http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11070700/how-can-i-style-a-part-of-a-single-character-with-overlays-using-a-dynamic-width because he found the answer on his own and thought it would be great to document the solution on StackOverflow. Understandably, the question was closed as Not a Real Question. Here is the original revision before 5 or 6 people all collabratively edited the post and reopened it:

The Question:

I wanted to ask the following question:

Can i style just a part of a single HTML character? For example an "X" which is half-way red and then black?

While playing around with a demo fiddle, i figured it out myself and wanted to share my solution. It's really simple.

By the way, my intention was styling the Font Awesome [icon-star][1], so that i have an exact visualization of scores.

In the question, the op states his intention to answer his question. He broke the 4th wall!

When Jeff says "pretend you're on Jeopardy" what he really means to say is that we must ask our question as if we were the person experiencing the real, actual problem being faced. Then answer it separately, as if we were another person. In other words, pretend you're an actor on a stage playing the role of someone with a problem. Just like a professional actor, you must stay in character.

Self Answerer's Must Role Play:

For example, when self-answering, it's helpful to think of yourself as two people: jmort253(1) and jmort253(2). jmort253(1) has the question and posts it, including what problem he faced, what research he did, what alternatives he considered, and example code, if applicable. jmort253(1) should write the question from the perspective of someone who is having a problem and who simply cannot find the solution. In fact, in his role, he knows of no answer.

jmort253(2) on the other hand, sees the predicament jmort253(1) is in and answers the question, following all of the guidelines of "How to Answer", including real code and explanations and maybe supplementing the answer with a link.

Additionally, a third party coming to this page should not know that the question was self-answered. Imagine if usernames were hidden on all posts and everything was posted by Anonymous. There should be nothing in either question or answer that suggests it's self-answered or that something is amiss.

This is the true meaning of "pretend you're on Jeopardy".

The answer to this question seems very clear to me:

From Jeff Atwood's comment:

If the question wouldn't be allowed on SO as it stands -- and these clearly wouldn't -- there's no way a self-answer should make it immune to the regular standards we have for all incoming questions...

Let's treat these questions just like any other question. As a community, we need to train ourselves to hold these questions to the same standard we would any other question.

In fact, the community can -- and has -- stepped up to help fix these problems when they're encountered.

For instance, recently someone asked http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11070700/how-can-i-style-a-part-of-a-single-character-with-overlays-using-a-dynamic-width because he found the answer on his own and thought it would be great to document the solution on StackOverflow. Understandably, the question was closed as Not a Real Question. Here is the original revision before 5 or 6 people all collabratively edited the post and reopened it:

The Question:

I wanted to ask the following question:

Can i style just a part of a single HTML character? For example an "X" which is half-way red and then black?

While playing around with a demo fiddle, i figured it out myself and wanted to share my solution. It's really simple.

By the way, my intention was styling the Font Awesome [icon-star][1], so that i have an exact visualization of scores.

In the question, the op states his intention to answer his question. He broke the 4th wall!

When Jeff says "pretend you're on Jeopardy" what he really means to say is that we must ask our question as if we were the person experiencing the real, actual problem being faced. Then answer it separately, as if we were another person. In other words, pretend you're an actor on a stage playing the role of someone with a problem. Just like a professional actor, you must stay in character.

Self Answerer's Must Role Play:

For example, when self-answering, it's helpful to think of yourself as two people: jmort253(1) and jmort253(2). jmort253(1) has the question and posts it, including what problem he faced, what research he did, what alternatives he considered, and example code, if applicable. jmort253(1) should write the question from the perspective of someone who is having a problem and who simply cannot find the solution. In fact, in his role, he knows of no answer.

jmort253(2) on the other hand, sees the predicament jmort253(1) is in and answers the question, following all of the guidelines of "How to Answer", including real code and explanations and maybe supplementing the answer with a link.

Additionally, a third party coming to this page should not know that the question was self-answered. Imagine if usernames were hidden on all posts and everything was posted by Anonymous. There should be nothing in either question or answer that suggests it's self-answered or that something is amiss.

This is the true meaning of "pretend you're on Jeopardy".

1
source | link