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    Bounty Ended with 100 reputation awarded by Ben Lee
6 added 38 characters in body
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History

Over time, some close reasons that were carefully named came to be re-interpreted, and ultimately, misused.

Example: Too Localized.

Other carefully-chosen names repeatedly caused conflict due to the difference between the everyday meaning of the word and the Stack Exchange meaning of the word.

Example: Not constructive.
(To clarify, most people think this means being over-critical, whereas SE used it to mean open-to-debate, or even just having too large a number of OK possible answers.)

Solution: New, shiny close reasons that describe the actual reason.

Example: Primarily opinion-based.

What we should learn from history

Name your close reason with words that describe clearly to a newcomer what's wrong. Avoid redefining an everyday term such as constructive or on-topic. If it takes a paragraph to explain why not including code should be described as off-topic, it means you're not using language the same way as everyone else does.

(To clarify, most people think this means you've changed the subject matter to be something irrelevant, whereas Stack Exchange is now using it to mean that the question falls foul of one of the site's rules about what questions should be like.)

What should we do?

The best solution is simply to ditch the phrase off-topic, and use the actual close reason or a summary thereof when talking to users, and in the close dialog, group them as "site-specific reasons" instead of "off-topic".

Example: replace phrases like "closed as off topic: .... gave the reason .... should contain code" with "closed as bug not containing code".

That'll take too much time. Is there a simple, easy fix?

Yes, just find-and-replace the phrase off-topic with one that doesn't have a different meaning to what you're saying.

Examples:

  • inadmissible
  • doesn't meet community guidelines
  • doesn't meet community standards
  • against site guidelines
  • breaks a site rule
  • not permitted
  • etc... etc....

The key thing is to say what you mean, directly.

If you can just simply replace "off-topic" with "inadmissible" or similar, why hasn't it happened yet?

The people who can change it are also the people who have been calling it off-topic for the longest, and are most familiar with the reasoning that led to the label off-topic. The more experience you have with the phrase, the less you see it as a jarring misnomer, and the more you think it's normal.

Act now before we all forget what off-topic means to the rest of the world!

History

Over time, some close reasons that were carefully named came to be re-interpreted, and ultimately, misused.

Example: Too Localized.

Other carefully-chosen names repeatedly caused conflict due to the difference between the everyday meaning of the word and the Stack Exchange meaning of the word.

Example: Not constructive.
(To clarify, most people think this means being over-critical, whereas SE used it to mean open-to-debate, or even just having too large a number of OK possible answers.)

Solution: New, shiny close reasons that describe the actual reason.

Example: Primarily opinion-based.

What we should learn from history

Name your close reason with words that describe clearly to a newcomer what's wrong. Avoid redefining an everyday term such as constructive or on-topic. If it takes a paragraph to explain why not including code should be described as off-topic, it means you're not using language the same way as everyone else does.

(To clarify, most people think this means you've changed the subject matter to be something irrelevant, whereas Stack Exchange is now using it to mean that the question falls foul of one of the site's rules about what questions should be like.)

What should we do?

The best solution is simply to ditch the phrase off-topic, and use the actual close reason or a summary thereof when talking to users, and in the close dialog, group them as "site-specific reasons" instead of "off-topic".

Example: replace phrases like "closed as off topic: .... gave the reason .... should contain code" with "closed as bug not containing code".

That'll take too much time. Is there a simple, easy fix?

Yes, just find-and-replace the phrase off-topic with one that doesn't have a different meaning to what you're saying.

Examples:

  • inadmissible
  • doesn't meet community standards
  • against site guidelines
  • breaks a site rule
  • not permitted
  • etc... etc....

The key thing is to say what you mean, directly.

If you can just simply replace "off-topic" with "inadmissible" or similar, why hasn't it happened yet?

The people who can change it are also the people who have been calling it off-topic for the longest, and are most familiar with the reasoning that led to the label off-topic. The more experience you have with the phrase, the less you see it as a jarring misnomer, and the more you think it's normal.

Act now before we all forget what off-topic means to the rest of the world!

History

Over time, some close reasons that were carefully named came to be re-interpreted, and ultimately, misused.

Example: Too Localized.

Other carefully-chosen names repeatedly caused conflict due to the difference between the everyday meaning of the word and the Stack Exchange meaning of the word.

Example: Not constructive.
(To clarify, most people think this means being over-critical, whereas SE used it to mean open-to-debate, or even just having too large a number of OK possible answers.)

Solution: New, shiny close reasons that describe the actual reason.

Example: Primarily opinion-based.

What we should learn from history

Name your close reason with words that describe clearly to a newcomer what's wrong. Avoid redefining an everyday term such as constructive or on-topic. If it takes a paragraph to explain why not including code should be described as off-topic, it means you're not using language the same way as everyone else does.

(To clarify, most people think this means you've changed the subject matter to be something irrelevant, whereas Stack Exchange is now using it to mean that the question falls foul of one of the site's rules about what questions should be like.)

What should we do?

The best solution is simply to ditch the phrase off-topic, and use the actual close reason or a summary thereof when talking to users, and in the close dialog, group them as "site-specific reasons" instead of "off-topic".

Example: replace phrases like "closed as off topic: .... gave the reason .... should contain code" with "closed as bug not containing code".

That'll take too much time. Is there a simple, easy fix?

Yes, just find-and-replace the phrase off-topic with one that doesn't have a different meaning to what you're saying.

Examples:

  • inadmissible
  • doesn't meet community guidelines
  • doesn't meet community standards
  • against site guidelines
  • breaks a site rule
  • not permitted
  • etc... etc....

The key thing is to say what you mean, directly.

If you can just simply replace "off-topic" with "inadmissible" or similar, why hasn't it happened yet?

The people who can change it are also the people who have been calling it off-topic for the longest, and are most familiar with the reasoning that led to the label off-topic. The more experience you have with the phrase, the less you see it as a jarring misnomer, and the more you think it's normal.

Act now before we all forget what off-topic means to the rest of the world!

5 edited body
source | link

History

Over time, some close reasons that were carefully named came to be re-interpreted, and untimatelyultimately, misused.

Example: Too Localized.

Other carefully-chosen names repeatedly caused conflict due to the difference between the everyday meaning of the word and the Stack Exchange meaning of the word.

Example: Not constructive.
(To clarify, most people think this means being over-critical, whereas SE used it to mean open-to-debate, or even just having too large a number of OK possible answers.)

Solution: New, shiny close reasons that describe the actual reason.

Example: Primarily opinion-based.

What we should learn from history

Name your close reason with words that describe clearly to a newcomer what's wrong. Avoid redefining an everyday term such as constructive or on-topic. If it takes a paragraph to explain why not including code should be described as off-topic, it means you're not using language the same way as everyone else does.

(To clarify, most people think this means you've changed the subject matter to be something irrelevant, whereas Stack Exchange is now using it to mean that the question falls foul of one of the site's rules about what questions should be like.)

What should we do?

The best solution is simply to ditch the phrase off-topic, and use the actual close reason or a summary thereof when talking to users, and in the close dialog, group them as "site-specific reasons" instead of "off-topic".

Example: replace phrases like "closed as off topic: .... gave the reason .... should contain code" with "closed as bug not containing code".

That'll take too much time. Is there a simple, easy fix?

Yes, just find-and-replace the phrase off-topic with one that doesn't have a different meaning to what you're saying.

Examples:

  • inadmissible
  • doesn't meet community standards
  • against site guidelines
  • breaks a site rule
  • not permitted
  • etc... etc....

The key thing is to say what you mean, directly.

If you can just simply replace "off-topic" with "inadmissible" or similar, why hasn't it happened yet?

The people who can change it are also the people who have been calling it off-topic for the longest, and are most familiar with the reasoning that led to the label off-topic. The more experience you have with the phrase, the less you see it as a jarring misnomer, and the more you think it's normal.

Act now before we all forget what off-topic means to the rest of the world!

History

Over time, some close reasons that were carefully named came to be re-interpreted, and untimately, misused.

Example: Too Localized.

Other carefully-chosen names repeatedly caused conflict due to the difference between the everyday meaning of the word and the Stack Exchange meaning of the word.

Example: Not constructive.
(To clarify, most people think this means being over-critical, whereas SE used it to mean open-to-debate, or even just having too large a number of OK possible answers.)

Solution: New, shiny close reasons that describe the actual reason.

Example: Primarily opinion-based.

What we should learn from history

Name your close reason with words that describe clearly to a newcomer what's wrong. Avoid redefining an everyday term such as constructive or on-topic. If it takes a paragraph to explain why not including code should be described as off-topic, it means you're not using language the same way as everyone else does.

(To clarify, most people think this means you've changed the subject matter to be something irrelevant, whereas Stack Exchange is now using it to mean that the question falls foul of one of the site's rules about what questions should be like.)

What should we do?

The best solution is simply to ditch the phrase off-topic, and use the actual close reason or a summary thereof when talking to users, and in the close dialog, group them as "site-specific reasons" instead of "off-topic".

Example: replace phrases like "closed as off topic: .... gave the reason .... should contain code" with "closed as bug not containing code".

That'll take too much time. Is there a simple, easy fix?

Yes, just find-and-replace the phrase off-topic with one that doesn't have a different meaning to what you're saying.

Examples:

  • inadmissible
  • doesn't meet community standards
  • against site guidelines
  • breaks a site rule
  • not permitted
  • etc... etc....

The key thing is to say what you mean, directly.

If you can just simply replace "off-topic" with "inadmissible" or similar, why hasn't it happened yet?

The people who can change it are also the people who have been calling it off-topic for the longest, and are most familiar with the reasoning that led to the label off-topic. The more experience you have with the phrase, the less you see it as a jarring misnomer, and the more you think it's normal.

Act now before we all forget what off-topic means to the rest of the world!

History

Over time, some close reasons that were carefully named came to be re-interpreted, and ultimately, misused.

Example: Too Localized.

Other carefully-chosen names repeatedly caused conflict due to the difference between the everyday meaning of the word and the Stack Exchange meaning of the word.

Example: Not constructive.
(To clarify, most people think this means being over-critical, whereas SE used it to mean open-to-debate, or even just having too large a number of OK possible answers.)

Solution: New, shiny close reasons that describe the actual reason.

Example: Primarily opinion-based.

What we should learn from history

Name your close reason with words that describe clearly to a newcomer what's wrong. Avoid redefining an everyday term such as constructive or on-topic. If it takes a paragraph to explain why not including code should be described as off-topic, it means you're not using language the same way as everyone else does.

(To clarify, most people think this means you've changed the subject matter to be something irrelevant, whereas Stack Exchange is now using it to mean that the question falls foul of one of the site's rules about what questions should be like.)

What should we do?

The best solution is simply to ditch the phrase off-topic, and use the actual close reason or a summary thereof when talking to users, and in the close dialog, group them as "site-specific reasons" instead of "off-topic".

Example: replace phrases like "closed as off topic: .... gave the reason .... should contain code" with "closed as bug not containing code".

That'll take too much time. Is there a simple, easy fix?

Yes, just find-and-replace the phrase off-topic with one that doesn't have a different meaning to what you're saying.

Examples:

  • inadmissible
  • doesn't meet community standards
  • against site guidelines
  • breaks a site rule
  • not permitted
  • etc... etc....

The key thing is to say what you mean, directly.

If you can just simply replace "off-topic" with "inadmissible" or similar, why hasn't it happened yet?

The people who can change it are also the people who have been calling it off-topic for the longest, and are most familiar with the reasoning that led to the label off-topic. The more experience you have with the phrase, the less you see it as a jarring misnomer, and the more you think it's normal.

Act now before we all forget what off-topic means to the rest of the world!

4 I'll accept anything accurate
source | link

History

Over time, some close reasons that were carefully named came to be re-interpreted, and untimately, misused.

Example: Too Localized.

Other carefully-chosen names repeatedly caused conflict due to the difference between the everyday meaning of the word and the Stack Exchange meaning of the word.

Example: Not constructive.
(To clarify, most people think this means being over-critical, whereas SE used it to mean open-to-debate, or even just having too large a number of OK possible answers.)

Solution: New, shiny close reasons that describe the actual reason.

Example: Primarily opinion-based.

What we should learn from history

Name your close reason with words that describe clearly to a newcomer what's wrong. Avoid redefining an everyday term such as constructive or on-topic. If it takes a paragraph to explain why not including code should be described as off-topic, it means you're not using language the same way as everyone else does.

(To clarify, most people think this means you've changed the subject matter to be something irrelevant, whereas Stack Exchange is now using it to mean that the question falls foul of one of the site's rules about what questions should be like.)

What should we do?

The best solution is simply to ditch the phrase off-topic, and use the actual close reason or a summary thereof when talking to users, and in the close dialog, group them as "site-specific reasons" instead of "off-topic".

Example: replace phrases like "closed as off topic: .... gave the reason .... should contain code" with "closed as bug not containing code".

That'll take too much time. Is there a simple, easy fix?

Yes, just find-and-replace the phrase off-topic with one that doesn't have a different meaning to what you're saying.

Examples:

  • inadmissible
  • doesn't meet community standards
  • against site guidelines
  • breaks a site rule
  • not permitted
  • etc... etc....

The key thing is to say what you mean, directly.

If you can just simply replace "off-topic" with "inadmissible" or similar, why hasn't it happened yet?

The people who can change it are also the people who have been calling it off-topic for the longest, and are most familiar with the reasoning that led to the label off-topic. The more experience you have with the phrase, the less you see it as a jarring misnomer, and the more you think it's normal.

Act now before we all forget what off-topic means to the rest of the world!

History

Over time, some close reasons that were carefully named came to be re-interpreted, and untimately, misused.

Example: Too Localized.

Other carefully-chosen names repeatedly caused conflict due to the difference between the everyday meaning of the word and the Stack Exchange meaning of the word.

Example: Not constructive.
(To clarify, most people think this means being over-critical, whereas SE used it to mean open-to-debate, or even just having too large a number of OK possible answers.)

Solution: New, shiny close reasons that describe the actual reason.

Example: Primarily opinion-based.

What we should learn from history

Name your close reason with words that describe clearly to a newcomer what's wrong. Avoid redefining an everyday term such as constructive or on-topic. If it takes a paragraph to explain why not including code should be described as off-topic, it means you're not using language the same way as everyone else does.

(To clarify, most people think this means you've changed the subject matter to be something irrelevant, whereas Stack Exchange is now using it to mean that the question falls foul of one of the site's rules about what questions should be like.)

What should we do?

The best solution is simply to ditch the phrase off-topic, and use the actual close reason or a summary thereof when talking to users, and in the close dialog, group them as "site-specific reasons" instead of "off-topic".

Example: replace phrases like "closed as off topic: .... gave the reason .... should contain code" with "closed as bug not containing code".

That'll take too much time. Is there a simple, easy fix?

Yes, just find-and-replace the phrase off-topic with one that doesn't have a different meaning to what you're saying.

Examples:

  • inadmissible
  • against site guidelines
  • breaks a site rule
  • not permitted
  • etc... etc....

The key thing is to say what you mean, directly.

If you can just simply replace "off-topic" with "inadmissible" or similar, why hasn't it happened yet?

The people who can change it are also the people who have been calling it off-topic for the longest, and are most familiar with the reasoning that led to the label off-topic. The more experience you have with the phrase, the less you see it as a jarring misnomer, and the more you think it's normal.

Act now before we all forget what off-topic means to the rest of the world!

History

Over time, some close reasons that were carefully named came to be re-interpreted, and untimately, misused.

Example: Too Localized.

Other carefully-chosen names repeatedly caused conflict due to the difference between the everyday meaning of the word and the Stack Exchange meaning of the word.

Example: Not constructive.
(To clarify, most people think this means being over-critical, whereas SE used it to mean open-to-debate, or even just having too large a number of OK possible answers.)

Solution: New, shiny close reasons that describe the actual reason.

Example: Primarily opinion-based.

What we should learn from history

Name your close reason with words that describe clearly to a newcomer what's wrong. Avoid redefining an everyday term such as constructive or on-topic. If it takes a paragraph to explain why not including code should be described as off-topic, it means you're not using language the same way as everyone else does.

(To clarify, most people think this means you've changed the subject matter to be something irrelevant, whereas Stack Exchange is now using it to mean that the question falls foul of one of the site's rules about what questions should be like.)

What should we do?

The best solution is simply to ditch the phrase off-topic, and use the actual close reason or a summary thereof when talking to users, and in the close dialog, group them as "site-specific reasons" instead of "off-topic".

Example: replace phrases like "closed as off topic: .... gave the reason .... should contain code" with "closed as bug not containing code".

That'll take too much time. Is there a simple, easy fix?

Yes, just find-and-replace the phrase off-topic with one that doesn't have a different meaning to what you're saying.

Examples:

  • inadmissible
  • doesn't meet community standards
  • against site guidelines
  • breaks a site rule
  • not permitted
  • etc... etc....

The key thing is to say what you mean, directly.

If you can just simply replace "off-topic" with "inadmissible" or similar, why hasn't it happened yet?

The people who can change it are also the people who have been calling it off-topic for the longest, and are most familiar with the reasoning that led to the label off-topic. The more experience you have with the phrase, the less you see it as a jarring misnomer, and the more you think it's normal.

Act now before we all forget what off-topic means to the rest of the world!

3 added 493 characters in body
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2 added 1 characters in body
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