2 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
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If it looks outright spammy, it's probably spam, so just flag as spam. You'll know it when you see it in most cases.

If you're not comfortable flagging them as spam, either because there are so many of them or because it looks like an honest user trying to promote their product or service, you can always raise a single custom flag and explain to us that the user appears to be posting solely for the purpose of self-promotion, and we'll address the situation as appropriate.

The help centerhelp center has some good guidance on what to do and what not to do in terms of self-promotional content:

Avoid overt self-promotion.

The community tends to vote down overt self-promotion and flag it as spam. Post good, relevant answers, and if some (but not all) happen to be about your product or website, that’s okay. However, you must disclose your affiliation in your answers.

If a large percentage of your posts include a mention of your product or website, you're probably here for the wrong reasons. Our advertising rates are quite reasonable; contact our ad sales team for details. We also offer free community promotion ads for open source projects and non-profit organizations.

If a user appears to be a mindless spammer, we'll usually nuke the account. If a user looks like they're simply trying too hard to self-promote, we'll talk to them.

If it looks outright spammy, it's probably spam, so just flag as spam. You'll know it when you see it in most cases.

If you're not comfortable flagging them as spam, either because there are so many of them or because it looks like an honest user trying to promote their product or service, you can always raise a single custom flag and explain to us that the user appears to be posting solely for the purpose of self-promotion, and we'll address the situation as appropriate.

The help center has some good guidance on what to do and what not to do in terms of self-promotional content:

Avoid overt self-promotion.

The community tends to vote down overt self-promotion and flag it as spam. Post good, relevant answers, and if some (but not all) happen to be about your product or website, that’s okay. However, you must disclose your affiliation in your answers.

If a large percentage of your posts include a mention of your product or website, you're probably here for the wrong reasons. Our advertising rates are quite reasonable; contact our ad sales team for details. We also offer free community promotion ads for open source projects and non-profit organizations.

If a user appears to be a mindless spammer, we'll usually nuke the account. If a user looks like they're simply trying too hard to self-promote, we'll talk to them.

If it looks outright spammy, it's probably spam, so just flag as spam. You'll know it when you see it in most cases.

If you're not comfortable flagging them as spam, either because there are so many of them or because it looks like an honest user trying to promote their product or service, you can always raise a single custom flag and explain to us that the user appears to be posting solely for the purpose of self-promotion, and we'll address the situation as appropriate.

The help center has some good guidance on what to do and what not to do in terms of self-promotional content:

Avoid overt self-promotion.

The community tends to vote down overt self-promotion and flag it as spam. Post good, relevant answers, and if some (but not all) happen to be about your product or website, that’s okay. However, you must disclose your affiliation in your answers.

If a large percentage of your posts include a mention of your product or website, you're probably here for the wrong reasons. Our advertising rates are quite reasonable; contact our ad sales team for details. We also offer free community promotion ads for open source projects and non-profit organizations.

If a user appears to be a mindless spammer, we'll usually nuke the account. If a user looks like they're simply trying too hard to self-promote, we'll talk to them.

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source | link

If it looks outright spammy, it's probably spam, so just flag as spam. You'll know it when you see it in most cases.

If you're not comfortable flagging them as spam, either because there are so many of them or because it looks like an honest user trying to promote their product or service, you can always raise a single custom flag and explain to us that the user appears to be posting solely for the purpose of self-promotion, and we'll address the situation as appropriate.

The help center has some good guidance on what to do and what not to do in terms of self-promotional content:

Avoid overt self-promotion.

The community tends to vote down overt self-promotion and flag it as spam. Post good, relevant answers, and if some (but not all) happen to be about your product or website, that’s okay. However, you must disclose your affiliation in your answers.

If a large percentage of your posts include a mention of your product or website, you're probably here for the wrong reasons. Our advertising rates are quite reasonable; contact our ad sales team for details. We also offer free community promotion ads for open source projects and non-profit organizations.

If a user appears to be a mindless spammer, we'll usually nuke the account. If a user looks like they're simply trying too hard to self-promote, we'll talk to them.