4 added 66 characters in body
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  • [Anyone] Our voices - Look, talking with people is great, but once a situation has started, it's awfully difficult to wind it down. This is equally true on IRC and on Stack Exchange chat, and of the dozens of times I've been tasked with cooling things down, they rarely succeed.

    Even if they do succeed, there's a very long period of tension that evolves as a result, and it leaves a stain on the local culture of the room.

  • [Anyone] Casting flags - This is actually detrimental to an evolving situation. It prompts all active 10K users and moderators to poke in and see what's up, which, to the users in the room, only feels like prying from outside. Any attempt by many people to adjudicate a room's proceedings from the outside is an affront to the members of the room, and in truth, this is a response that actually makes sense.

  • [10K, Mod] Approving flags - This deletes the message but doesn't solve the underlying problem, making it effectively totally useless in the long term.

  • [Owner, Mod] Room timeouts - "Cool, our room's gone. Where should we go next? Hey, how about we make a new room to express our bitterness that some mod just ruined our fun?"

    Nobody's behavior is changed by room timeouts.

  • [Owner, Mod] Kick/mute - See suspensions.

  • [Mod] Room freezing - See room timeouts.

  • [Mod] User suspension - This is a big one, and one could say it's the last resort - the ultimate chat moderation tool.

    Unfortunately, suspensions are useless.

    Here's the thing: automatic suspensions go in increments of 30 minutes. Suspensions by a moderator rarely last more than a couple hours to a few days. This doesn't solve the problem at all. It's a thwack on the wrists to users who are used to thwackin'.

    Moderators for IRC recognize a simple truth about chat: once a troll, always a troll; onceuser has clearly identified that they are a problem user, alwaysit is very difficult to change them into a problem userconstructive one. Obviously, it's an aphorisma generalization that has its exceptions, but it guidesstill informs a strictstricter moderation policy. On IRC, you get close to zero - often actually zero - warnings before you are permanently banned for disruptive behavior. Why? Because the mods know you'll be back, and they know temporary bans rarely work.

    Your post makes this point even more stark: on IRC, things are transient and vanish. On Stack Exchange chat, messages are permanent - and yet, we let people talk so freely without fear of real repercussion.

  • [Anyone] Our voices - Look, talking with people is great, but once a situation has started, it's awfully difficult to wind it down. This is equally true on IRC and on Stack Exchange chat, and of the dozens of times I've been tasked with cooling things down, they rarely succeed.

    Even if they do succeed, there's a very long period of tension that evolves as a result, and it leaves a stain on the local culture of the room.

  • [Anyone] Casting flags - This is actually detrimental to an evolving situation. It prompts all active 10K users and moderators to poke in and see what's up, which, to the users in the room, only feels like prying from outside. Any attempt by many people to adjudicate a room's proceedings from the outside is an affront to the members of the room, and in truth, this is a response that actually makes sense.

  • [10K, Mod] Approving flags - This deletes the message but doesn't solve the underlying problem, making it effectively totally useless in the long term.

  • [Owner, Mod] Room timeouts - "Cool, our room's gone. Where should we go next? Hey, how about we make a new room to express our bitterness that some mod just ruined our fun?"

    Nobody's behavior is changed by room timeouts.

  • [Owner, Mod] Kick/mute - See suspensions.

  • [Mod] Room freezing - See room timeouts.

  • [Mod] User suspension - This is a big one, and one could say it's the last resort - the ultimate chat moderation tool.

    Unfortunately, suspensions are useless.

    Here's the thing: automatic suspensions go in increments of 30 minutes. Suspensions by a moderator rarely last more than a couple hours to a few days. This doesn't solve the problem at all. It's a thwack on the wrists to users who are used to thwackin'.

    Moderators for IRC recognize a simple truth about chat: once a troll, always a troll; once a problem user, always a problem user. Obviously, it's an aphorism that has its exceptions, but it guides a strict moderation policy. On IRC, you get close to zero - often actually zero - warnings before you are permanently banned for disruptive behavior. Why? Because the mods know you'll be back, and they know temporary bans rarely work.

    Your post makes this point even more stark: on IRC, things are transient and vanish. On Stack Exchange chat, messages are permanent - and yet, we let people talk so freely without fear of real repercussion.

  • [Anyone] Our voices - Look, talking with people is great, but once a situation has started, it's awfully difficult to wind it down. This is equally true on IRC and on Stack Exchange chat, and of the dozens of times I've been tasked with cooling things down, they rarely succeed.

    Even if they do succeed, there's a very long period of tension that evolves as a result, and it leaves a stain on the local culture of the room.

  • [Anyone] Casting flags - This is actually detrimental to an evolving situation. It prompts all active 10K users and moderators to poke in and see what's up, which, to the users in the room, only feels like prying from outside. Any attempt by many people to adjudicate a room's proceedings from the outside is an affront to the members of the room, and in truth, this is a response that actually makes sense.

  • [10K, Mod] Approving flags - This deletes the message but doesn't solve the underlying problem, making it effectively totally useless in the long term.

  • [Owner, Mod] Room timeouts - "Cool, our room's gone. Where should we go next? Hey, how about we make a new room to express our bitterness that some mod just ruined our fun?"

    Nobody's behavior is changed by room timeouts.

  • [Owner, Mod] Kick/mute - See suspensions.

  • [Mod] Room freezing - See room timeouts.

  • [Mod] User suspension - This is a big one, and one could say it's the last resort - the ultimate chat moderation tool.

    Unfortunately, suspensions are useless.

    Here's the thing: automatic suspensions go in increments of 30 minutes. Suspensions by a moderator rarely last more than a couple hours to a few days. This doesn't solve the problem at all. It's a thwack on the wrists to users who are used to thwackin'.

    Moderators for IRC recognize a simple truth about chat: once a user has clearly identified that they are a problem user, it is very difficult to change them into a constructive one. Obviously, it's a generalization that has its exceptions, but it still informs a stricter moderation policy. On IRC, you get close to zero - often actually zero - warnings before you are permanently banned for disruptive behavior. Why? Because the mods know you'll be back, and they know temporary bans rarely work.

    Your post makes this point even more stark: on IRC, things are transient and vanish. On Stack Exchange chat, messages are permanent - and yet, we let people talk so freely without fear of real repercussion.

3 added 95 characters in body
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  • [Anyone] Our voices - Look, talking with people is great, but once a situation has started, it's awfully difficult to wind it down. This is equally true on IRC and on Stack Exchange chat, and of the dozens of times I've been tasked with cooling things down, they rarely succeed.

    Even if they do succeed, there's a very long period of tension that evolves as a result, and it leaves a stain on the local culture of the room.

  • [Anyone] Casting flags - This is actually detrimental to an evolving situation. It prompts all active 10K users and moderators to poke in and see what's up, which, to the users in the room, only feels like prying from outside. Any attempt by many people to adjudicate a room's proceedings from the outside is an affront to the members of the room, and in truth, this is a response that actually makes sense.

  • [10K, Mod] Approving flags - This deletes the message but doesn't solve the underlying problem, making it effectively totally useless in the long term.

  • [Owner, Mod] Room timeouts - "Cool, our room's gone. Where should we go next? Hey, how about we make a new room to express our bitterness that some mod just ruined our fun?"

    Nobody's behavior is changed by room timeouts.

  • [Owner, Mod] Kick/mute - See suspensions.

  • [Mod] Room freezing - See room timeouts.

  • [Mod] User suspension - This is a big one, and one could say it's the last resort - the ultimate chat moderation tool.

    Unfortunately, suspensions are useless.

    Here's the thing: automatic suspensions go in increments of 30 minutes. Suspensions by a moderator rarely last more than a couple hours to a few days. This doesn't solve the problem at all. It's a thwack on the wrists to users who are used to thwackin'.

    Moderators for IRC recognize a simple truth about chat: once a troll, always a troll; once a problem user, always a problem user. Obviously, it's an aphorism that has its exceptions, but it guides a strict moderation policy. On IRC, you get close to zero - often actually zero - warnings before you are permanently banned for disruptive behavior. Why? Because the mods know you'll be back, and they know temporary bans rarely work.

    Your post makes this point even more stark: on IRC, things are transient and vanish. On Stack Exchange chat, messages are permanent - and yet, we let people talk so freely without fear of real repercussion.

  • [Anyone] Our voices - Look, talking with people is great, but once a situation has started, it's awfully difficult to wind it down. This is equally true on IRC and on Stack Exchange chat, and of the dozens of times I've been tasked with cooling things down, they rarely succeed.

    Even if they do succeed, there's a very long period of tension that evolves as a result, and it leaves a stain on the local culture of the room.

  • [Anyone] Casting flags - This is actually detrimental to an evolving situation. It prompts all active 10K users and moderators to poke in and see what's up, which, to the users in the room, only feels like prying from outside. Any attempt by many people to adjudicate a room's proceedings from the outside is an affront to the members of the room, and in truth, this is a response that actually makes sense.

  • [10K, Mod] Approving flags - This deletes the message but doesn't solve the underlying problem, making it effectively totally useless in the long term.

  • [Owner, Mod] Room timeouts - "Cool, our room's gone. Where should we go next? Hey, how about we make a new room to express our bitterness that some mod just ruined our fun?"

    Nobody's behavior is changed by room timeouts.

  • [Owner, Mod] Kick/mute - See suspensions.

  • [Mod] Room freezing - See room timeouts.

  • [Mod] User suspension - This is a big one, and one could say it's the last resort - the ultimate chat moderation tool.

    Unfortunately, suspensions are useless.

    Here's the thing: automatic suspensions go in increments of 30 minutes. Suspensions by a moderator rarely last more than a couple hours to a few days. This doesn't solve the problem at all. It's a thwack on the wrists to users who are used to thwackin'.

    Moderators for IRC recognize a simple truth about chat: once a troll, always a troll; once a problem user, always a problem user. On IRC, you get close to zero - often actually zero - warnings before you are permanently banned for disruptive behavior. Why? Because the mods know you'll be back, and they know temporary bans rarely work.

    Your post makes this point even more stark: on IRC, things are transient and vanish. On Stack Exchange chat, messages are permanent - and yet, we let people talk so freely without fear of real repercussion.

  • [Anyone] Our voices - Look, talking with people is great, but once a situation has started, it's awfully difficult to wind it down. This is equally true on IRC and on Stack Exchange chat, and of the dozens of times I've been tasked with cooling things down, they rarely succeed.

    Even if they do succeed, there's a very long period of tension that evolves as a result, and it leaves a stain on the local culture of the room.

  • [Anyone] Casting flags - This is actually detrimental to an evolving situation. It prompts all active 10K users and moderators to poke in and see what's up, which, to the users in the room, only feels like prying from outside. Any attempt by many people to adjudicate a room's proceedings from the outside is an affront to the members of the room, and in truth, this is a response that actually makes sense.

  • [10K, Mod] Approving flags - This deletes the message but doesn't solve the underlying problem, making it effectively totally useless in the long term.

  • [Owner, Mod] Room timeouts - "Cool, our room's gone. Where should we go next? Hey, how about we make a new room to express our bitterness that some mod just ruined our fun?"

    Nobody's behavior is changed by room timeouts.

  • [Owner, Mod] Kick/mute - See suspensions.

  • [Mod] Room freezing - See room timeouts.

  • [Mod] User suspension - This is a big one, and one could say it's the last resort - the ultimate chat moderation tool.

    Unfortunately, suspensions are useless.

    Here's the thing: automatic suspensions go in increments of 30 minutes. Suspensions by a moderator rarely last more than a couple hours to a few days. This doesn't solve the problem at all. It's a thwack on the wrists to users who are used to thwackin'.

    Moderators for IRC recognize a simple truth about chat: once a troll, always a troll; once a problem user, always a problem user. Obviously, it's an aphorism that has its exceptions, but it guides a strict moderation policy. On IRC, you get close to zero - often actually zero - warnings before you are permanently banned for disruptive behavior. Why? Because the mods know you'll be back, and they know temporary bans rarely work.

    Your post makes this point even more stark: on IRC, things are transient and vanish. On Stack Exchange chat, messages are permanent - and yet, we let people talk so freely without fear of real repercussion.

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Chat doesn't work the same way. Right now, we're seeing the consequences chat's distinct lack of moderation, simply because the tools we've been given simply don't do the job they're supposed to.

Chat doesn't work the same way. Right now, we're seeing the consequences chat's distinct lack of moderation, simply because the tools we've been given simply don't do the job they're supposed to.

Chat doesn't work the same way. Right now, we're seeing the consequences chat's distinct lack of moderation, simply because the tools we've been given don't do the job they're supposed to.

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