2 added 161 characters in body
source | link

A few years back, I donated blood pretty regularly (I'm O+). When a family member got cancer, I stopped donating so I'd have a pint ready if they needed one. The need never arose and, at this point, won't. (For those thinking about doing this, retrospectively I'd recommend that you continue your regular donation schedule unless your relative has a particularly rare type that you match. I think this would have done more net good.)

I've been trying to get in the habit of donating again this past year by inviting friends to donate with me. In practice, this has meant donating less than I otherwise would, but I think it's been a net positive: many folks want to donate and are up for it if they have a friend along.

One reason I feel it's important to donate is that a lot of people who would like to can't.

Remember the shooting at that gay nightclub in Orlando? Afterwards, many people wanted to donate, but donations from "men who have had sex with men" are restricted. It sucks when you want to help someone and you can't. It sucks when things are out of your control.

Do you have globe-trotting friends? They may not be able to donate either. Spending time in the tropics, the United Kingdom, or a host of other places makes a person ineligible to donate (in the US) either temporarily or permanently.

It can also be more random. At one point people in Miami couldn't donate due to Zika virus.

In total, only 38% of the U.S. can donate. And only 10% of those who are eligible do.

96% of us in the US rely, every day, on the 4% of the US who does donate.

If you can donate, you should. [7] Do it for yourself. Do it for your friends. Do it because your friends can't and have friends who need it.

I'm going to try to be better at donating this coming year, and I hope you will to.

If you're in the SF Bay Area (or Seattle, Boulder, or Boston - I travel often) and would like someone to donate with, drop me a line!

Donate blood

^ This could be you! ^

(I primarily use StackOverflow and SciComp.)

A few years back, I donated blood pretty regularly (I'm O+). When a family member got cancer, I stopped donating so I'd have a pint ready if they needed one. The need never arose and, at this point, won't. (For those thinking about doing this, retrospectively I'd recommend that you continue your regular donation schedule unless your relative has a particularly rare type that you match. I think this would have done more net good.)

I've been trying to get in the habit of donating again this past year by inviting friends to donate with me. In practice, this has meant donating less than I otherwise would, but I think it's been a net positive: many folks want to donate and are up for it if they have a friend along.

One reason I feel it's important to donate is that a lot of people who would like to can't.

Remember the shooting at that gay nightclub in Orlando? Afterwards, many people wanted to donate, but donations from "men who have had sex with men" are restricted. It sucks when you want to help someone and you can't. It sucks when things are out of your control.

Do you have globe-trotting friends? They may not be able to donate either. Spending time in the tropics, the United Kingdom, or a host of other places makes a person ineligible to donate (in the US) either temporarily or permanently.

It can also be more random. At one point people in Miami couldn't donate due to Zika virus.

In total, only 38% of the U.S. can donate. And only 10% of those who are eligible do.

96% of us in the US rely, every day, on the 4% of the US who does donate.

If you can donate, you should. [7] Do it for yourself. Do it for your friends. Do it because your friends can't and have friends who need it.

I'm going to try to be better at donating this coming year, and I hope you will to.

If you're in the SF Bay Area (or Seattle, Boulder, or Boston - I travel often) and would like someone to donate with, drop me a line!

A few years back, I donated blood pretty regularly (I'm O+). When a family member got cancer, I stopped donating so I'd have a pint ready if they needed one. The need never arose and, at this point, won't. (For those thinking about doing this, retrospectively I'd recommend that you continue your regular donation schedule unless your relative has a particularly rare type that you match. I think this would have done more net good.)

I've been trying to get in the habit of donating again this past year by inviting friends to donate with me. In practice, this has meant donating less than I otherwise would, but I think it's been a net positive: many folks want to donate and are up for it if they have a friend along.

One reason I feel it's important to donate is that a lot of people who would like to can't.

Remember the shooting at that gay nightclub in Orlando? Afterwards, many people wanted to donate, but donations from "men who have had sex with men" are restricted. It sucks when you want to help someone and you can't. It sucks when things are out of your control.

Do you have globe-trotting friends? They may not be able to donate either. Spending time in the tropics, the United Kingdom, or a host of other places makes a person ineligible to donate (in the US) either temporarily or permanently.

It can also be more random. At one point people in Miami couldn't donate due to Zika virus.

In total, only 38% of the U.S. can donate. And only 10% of those who are eligible do.

96% of us in the US rely, every day, on the 4% of the US who does donate.

If you can donate, you should. [7] Do it for yourself. Do it for your friends. Do it because your friends can't and have friends who need it.

I'm going to try to be better at donating this coming year, and I hope you will to.

If you're in the SF Bay Area (or Seattle, Boulder, or Boston - I travel often) and would like someone to donate with, drop me a line!

Donate blood

^ This could be you! ^

(I primarily use StackOverflow and SciComp.)

1
source | link

A few years back, I donated blood pretty regularly (I'm O+). When a family member got cancer, I stopped donating so I'd have a pint ready if they needed one. The need never arose and, at this point, won't. (For those thinking about doing this, retrospectively I'd recommend that you continue your regular donation schedule unless your relative has a particularly rare type that you match. I think this would have done more net good.)

I've been trying to get in the habit of donating again this past year by inviting friends to donate with me. In practice, this has meant donating less than I otherwise would, but I think it's been a net positive: many folks want to donate and are up for it if they have a friend along.

One reason I feel it's important to donate is that a lot of people who would like to can't.

Remember the shooting at that gay nightclub in Orlando? Afterwards, many people wanted to donate, but donations from "men who have had sex with men" are restricted. It sucks when you want to help someone and you can't. It sucks when things are out of your control.

Do you have globe-trotting friends? They may not be able to donate either. Spending time in the tropics, the United Kingdom, or a host of other places makes a person ineligible to donate (in the US) either temporarily or permanently.

It can also be more random. At one point people in Miami couldn't donate due to Zika virus.

In total, only 38% of the U.S. can donate. And only 10% of those who are eligible do.

96% of us in the US rely, every day, on the 4% of the US who does donate.

If you can donate, you should. [7] Do it for yourself. Do it for your friends. Do it because your friends can't and have friends who need it.

I'm going to try to be better at donating this coming year, and I hope you will to.

If you're in the SF Bay Area (or Seattle, Boulder, or Boston - I travel often) and would like someone to donate with, drop me a line!