2 edited body
source | link

The Creative Commons people have a note about this

It probably depends on the meaning of "derivedderived." It would be hard to make a case that incorporating a few lines of code would make the entire program a derivative work, and it would be hard to imagine somebody on SO mounting the expensive legal challenge which will almost certainly fail.

Perhaps it should be made the policy that code snippets fall under the CC BSD license as mentioned below, so that it's totally clear that incorporating code snippets in proprietary code is fine.

I personally use the "remember me if these 3 lines of code make you rich" license.

From the CC FAQ:

Can I use a Creative Commons license for software?

We do not recommend it. Creative Commons licenses should not be used for software. We strongly encourage you to use one of the very good software licenses which are already available. We recommend considering licenses made available by the Free Software Foundation or listed at the Open Source Initiative. Unlike our licenses, which do not make mention of source or object code, these existing licenses were designed specifically for use with software.

Creative Commons has “wrapped” some free software/open source licenses with a human-readable "Commons Deed" and machine-readable metadata. You may use these "wrapped" software licenses to take advantage of the Creative Commons human-readable document as well as the machine-readable metadata while still licensing your work under an established software license. It is important to note that CC has not altered these software licenses in any way, but has simply bundled human- and machine-readable explanations of the licenses along with the original license text.

http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Frequently_Asked_Questions

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BSD/

The Creative Commons people have a note about this

It probably depends on the meaning of "derived." It would be hard to make a case that incorporating a few lines of code would make the entire program a derivative work, and it would be hard to imagine somebody on SO mounting the expensive legal challenge which will almost certainly fail.

Perhaps it should be made the policy that code snippets fall under the CC BSD license as mentioned below, so that it's totally clear that incorporating code snippets in proprietary code is fine.

I personally use the "remember me if these 3 lines of code make you rich" license.

From the CC FAQ:

Can I use a Creative Commons license for software?

We do not recommend it. Creative Commons licenses should not be used for software. We strongly encourage you to use one of the very good software licenses which are already available. We recommend considering licenses made available by the Free Software Foundation or listed at the Open Source Initiative. Unlike our licenses, which do not make mention of source or object code, these existing licenses were designed specifically for use with software.

Creative Commons has “wrapped” some free software/open source licenses with a human-readable "Commons Deed" and machine-readable metadata. You may use these "wrapped" software licenses to take advantage of the Creative Commons human-readable document as well as the machine-readable metadata while still licensing your work under an established software license. It is important to note that CC has not altered these software licenses in any way, but has simply bundled human- and machine-readable explanations of the licenses along with the original license text.

http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Frequently_Asked_Questions

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BSD/

The Creative Commons people have a note about this

It probably depends on the meaning of derived. It would be hard to make a case that incorporating a few lines of code would make the entire program a derivative work, and it would be hard to imagine somebody on SO mounting the expensive legal challenge which will almost certainly fail.

Perhaps it should be made the policy that code snippets fall under the CC BSD license as mentioned below, so that it's totally clear that incorporating code snippets in proprietary code is fine.

I personally use the "remember me if these 3 lines of code make you rich" license.

From the CC FAQ:

Can I use a Creative Commons license for software?

We do not recommend it. Creative Commons licenses should not be used for software. We strongly encourage you to use one of the very good software licenses which are already available. We recommend considering licenses made available by the Free Software Foundation or listed at the Open Source Initiative. Unlike our licenses, which do not make mention of source or object code, these existing licenses were designed specifically for use with software.

Creative Commons has “wrapped” some free software/open source licenses with a human-readable "Commons Deed" and machine-readable metadata. You may use these "wrapped" software licenses to take advantage of the Creative Commons human-readable document as well as the machine-readable metadata while still licensing your work under an established software license. It is important to note that CC has not altered these software licenses in any way, but has simply bundled human- and machine-readable explanations of the licenses along with the original license text.

http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Frequently_Asked_Questions

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BSD/

1
source | link

The Creative Commons people have a note about this

It probably depends on the meaning of "derived." It would be hard to make a case that incorporating a few lines of code would make the entire program a derivative work, and it would be hard to imagine somebody on SO mounting the expensive legal challenge which will almost certainly fail.

Perhaps it should be made the policy that code snippets fall under the CC BSD license as mentioned below, so that it's totally clear that incorporating code snippets in proprietary code is fine.

I personally use the "remember me if these 3 lines of code make you rich" license.

From the CC FAQ:

Can I use a Creative Commons license for software?

We do not recommend it. Creative Commons licenses should not be used for software. We strongly encourage you to use one of the very good software licenses which are already available. We recommend considering licenses made available by the Free Software Foundation or listed at the Open Source Initiative. Unlike our licenses, which do not make mention of source or object code, these existing licenses were designed specifically for use with software.

Creative Commons has “wrapped” some free software/open source licenses with a human-readable "Commons Deed" and machine-readable metadata. You may use these "wrapped" software licenses to take advantage of the Creative Commons human-readable document as well as the machine-readable metadata while still licensing your work under an established software license. It is important to note that CC has not altered these software licenses in any way, but has simply bundled human- and machine-readable explanations of the licenses along with the original license text.

http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Frequently_Asked_Questions

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BSD/