5 replaced http://meta.stackexchange.com/ with https://meta.stackexchange.com/
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Another answerer claims 'shenanigans'Another answerer claims 'shenanigans', I say: Never ascribe to malice that which can be explained by incompetence.

The entire reason people ask questions is that they don't know the answer. They may pick an answer for a variety of reasons:

  1. It's first.
  2. It fixes their issue.
  3. It's last.
  4. A solar flare caused an atmospheric disturbance that moved the position of their mouse (Chaos theory, without the butterfly).

Does this mean the 'accepted answer' mechanism is faulty? No. It seems to work in the vast majority of cases, and where it doesn't can be explained by statistical outliers.

Should we do anything about it? No.

Another answerer claims 'shenanigans', I say: Never ascribe to malice that which can be explained by incompetence.

The entire reason people ask questions is that they don't know the answer. They may pick an answer for a variety of reasons:

  1. It's first.
  2. It fixes their issue.
  3. It's last.
  4. A solar flare caused an atmospheric disturbance that moved the position of their mouse (Chaos theory, without the butterfly).

Does this mean the 'accepted answer' mechanism is faulty? No. It seems to work in the vast majority of cases, and where it doesn't can be explained by statistical outliers.

Should we do anything about it? No.

Another answerer claims 'shenanigans', I say: Never ascribe to malice that which can be explained by incompetence.

The entire reason people ask questions is that they don't know the answer. They may pick an answer for a variety of reasons:

  1. It's first.
  2. It fixes their issue.
  3. It's last.
  4. A solar flare caused an atmospheric disturbance that moved the position of their mouse (Chaos theory, without the butterfly).

Does this mean the 'accepted answer' mechanism is faulty? No. It seems to work in the vast majority of cases, and where it doesn't can be explained by statistical outliers.

Should we do anything about it? No.

4 deleted 166 characters in body
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Another answerer claims 'shenanigans', I say: Never ascribe to malice that which can be explained by incompetence.

The entire reason people ask questions is that they don't know the answer. They may pick an answer for a variety of reasons:

  1. It's first.
  2. It fixes their issue.
  3. It's last.
  4. A solar flare caused an atmospheric disturbance that moved the position of their mouse (Chaos theory, without the butterfly).

Does this mean the 'accepted answer' mechanism is faulty? No. It seems to work in the vast majority of cases, and where it doesn't can be explained by statistical outliers.

Should we do anything about it? No.

Anyone who uses one of those answers clearly doesn't the mechanisms for determining the 'best' answer and probably should have their programming privileges revoked.

Another answerer claims 'shenanigans', I say: Never ascribe to malice that which can be explained by incompetence.

The entire reason people ask questions is that they don't know the answer. They may pick an answer for a variety of reasons:

  1. It's first.
  2. It fixes their issue.
  3. It's last.
  4. A solar flare caused an atmospheric disturbance that moved the position of their mouse (Chaos theory, without the butterfly).

Does this mean the 'accepted answer' mechanism is faulty? No. It seems to work in the vast majority of cases, and where it doesn't can be explained by statistical outliers.

Should we do anything about it? No.

Anyone who uses one of those answers clearly doesn't the mechanisms for determining the 'best' answer and probably should have their programming privileges revoked.

Another answerer claims 'shenanigans', I say: Never ascribe to malice that which can be explained by incompetence.

The entire reason people ask questions is that they don't know the answer. They may pick an answer for a variety of reasons:

  1. It's first.
  2. It fixes their issue.
  3. It's last.
  4. A solar flare caused an atmospheric disturbance that moved the position of their mouse (Chaos theory, without the butterfly).

Does this mean the 'accepted answer' mechanism is faulty? No. It seems to work in the vast majority of cases, and where it doesn't can be explained by statistical outliers.

Should we do anything about it? No.

3 Fixup of bad MSO links to MSE links migration
source | link

Another answerer claims 'shenanigans', I say: Never ascribe to malice that which can be explained by incompetence.

The entire reason people ask questions is that they don't know the answer. They may pick an answer for a variety of reasons:

  1. It's first.
  2. It fixes their issue.
  3. It's last.
  4. A solar flare caused an atmospheric disturbance that moved the position of their mouse (Chaos theory, without the butterfly).

Does this mean the 'accepted answer' mechanism is faulty? No. It seems to work in the vast majority of cases, and where it doesn't can be explained by statistical outliers.

Should we do anything about it? No.

Anyone who uses one of those answers clearly doesn't the mechanisms for determining the 'best' answer and probably should have their programming privileges revoked.

Another answerer claims 'shenanigans', I say: Never ascribe to malice that which can be explained by incompetence.

The entire reason people ask questions is that they don't know the answer. They may pick an answer for a variety of reasons:

  1. It's first.
  2. It fixes their issue.
  3. It's last.
  4. A solar flare caused an atmospheric disturbance that moved the position of their mouse (Chaos theory, without the butterfly).

Does this mean the 'accepted answer' mechanism is faulty? No. It seems to work in the vast majority of cases, and where it doesn't can be explained by statistical outliers.

Should we do anything about it? No.

Anyone who uses one of those answers clearly doesn't the mechanisms for determining the 'best' answer and probably should have their programming privileges revoked.

Another answerer claims 'shenanigans', I say: Never ascribe to malice that which can be explained by incompetence.

The entire reason people ask questions is that they don't know the answer. They may pick an answer for a variety of reasons:

  1. It's first.
  2. It fixes their issue.
  3. It's last.
  4. A solar flare caused an atmospheric disturbance that moved the position of their mouse (Chaos theory, without the butterfly).

Does this mean the 'accepted answer' mechanism is faulty? No. It seems to work in the vast majority of cases, and where it doesn't can be explained by statistical outliers.

Should we do anything about it? No.

Anyone who uses one of those answers clearly doesn't the mechanisms for determining the 'best' answer and probably should have their programming privileges revoked.

2 Migration of MSO links to MSE links
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