7 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
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  1. Not everyone who visits the question is going to want narrow answers: They may want good links to W3Schools. They may not know what W3Schools is. However, you'll notice that even removing that clause didn't lead to a deluge of 'Use W3Schools' answers, did it? That's because Stack Overflow rewards complete answers. It's more of a feeling than an outright scientific truth, but I've seen time and again that the more complete an answer is, the more upvotes it gets. You'll notice only one person put in a W3Schools link, and while it doesn't help you, it's potentially helpful to someone else stumbling on the question, and if the community thinks it's a good answer, they'll vote it up. If not, then there's really nothing for you to worry about.

  2. You asked about 9 questions in a one question answer. It really didn't have a theme, so I tried to break the question into some logical sections so that someone reading it wouldn't have a hard time following it. A better looking question gets better answers. Again, not a scientific truth, just something I've seen from being around here.

  3. I removed the 'tips and tricks' because that's awfully close to a List of X question, and those are not welcome on Stack Overflow. I didn't want your question closed by someone because it looked like a List of X question.

  4. Finally, I edited the question so that it would stand the test of time. The smileys and 'hi' and the school-room touch are cute, but they degrade the quality of the encyclopedic nature of the question. If someone comes from Google, they really don't care that you are thanking people, or that you put a smiley, or that you were being cute; they really just want a good answer to their question. That's the litmus test for a good question: Pageviews and how 'Googleable' it is. "How do I get started with HTML5' is very googleable -- that's a question I can see someone googling. I can't, however, see them googling 'Workflow and Tools' over it.

  5. The edit gave your question visibility. It received 5 more upvotesIt received 5 more upvotes after I edited your question, and now it's on the radar because now it's easy to search for.

  1. Not everyone who visits the question is going to want narrow answers: They may want good links to W3Schools. They may not know what W3Schools is. However, you'll notice that even removing that clause didn't lead to a deluge of 'Use W3Schools' answers, did it? That's because Stack Overflow rewards complete answers. It's more of a feeling than an outright scientific truth, but I've seen time and again that the more complete an answer is, the more upvotes it gets. You'll notice only one person put in a W3Schools link, and while it doesn't help you, it's potentially helpful to someone else stumbling on the question, and if the community thinks it's a good answer, they'll vote it up. If not, then there's really nothing for you to worry about.

  2. You asked about 9 questions in a one question answer. It really didn't have a theme, so I tried to break the question into some logical sections so that someone reading it wouldn't have a hard time following it. A better looking question gets better answers. Again, not a scientific truth, just something I've seen from being around here.

  3. I removed the 'tips and tricks' because that's awfully close to a List of X question, and those are not welcome on Stack Overflow. I didn't want your question closed by someone because it looked like a List of X question.

  4. Finally, I edited the question so that it would stand the test of time. The smileys and 'hi' and the school-room touch are cute, but they degrade the quality of the encyclopedic nature of the question. If someone comes from Google, they really don't care that you are thanking people, or that you put a smiley, or that you were being cute; they really just want a good answer to their question. That's the litmus test for a good question: Pageviews and how 'Googleable' it is. "How do I get started with HTML5' is very googleable -- that's a question I can see someone googling. I can't, however, see them googling 'Workflow and Tools' over it.

  5. The edit gave your question visibility. It received 5 more upvotes after I edited your question, and now it's on the radar because now it's easy to search for.

  1. Not everyone who visits the question is going to want narrow answers: They may want good links to W3Schools. They may not know what W3Schools is. However, you'll notice that even removing that clause didn't lead to a deluge of 'Use W3Schools' answers, did it? That's because Stack Overflow rewards complete answers. It's more of a feeling than an outright scientific truth, but I've seen time and again that the more complete an answer is, the more upvotes it gets. You'll notice only one person put in a W3Schools link, and while it doesn't help you, it's potentially helpful to someone else stumbling on the question, and if the community thinks it's a good answer, they'll vote it up. If not, then there's really nothing for you to worry about.

  2. You asked about 9 questions in a one question answer. It really didn't have a theme, so I tried to break the question into some logical sections so that someone reading it wouldn't have a hard time following it. A better looking question gets better answers. Again, not a scientific truth, just something I've seen from being around here.

  3. I removed the 'tips and tricks' because that's awfully close to a List of X question, and those are not welcome on Stack Overflow. I didn't want your question closed by someone because it looked like a List of X question.

  4. Finally, I edited the question so that it would stand the test of time. The smileys and 'hi' and the school-room touch are cute, but they degrade the quality of the encyclopedic nature of the question. If someone comes from Google, they really don't care that you are thanking people, or that you put a smiley, or that you were being cute; they really just want a good answer to their question. That's the litmus test for a good question: Pageviews and how 'Googleable' it is. "How do I get started with HTML5' is very googleable -- that's a question I can see someone googling. I can't, however, see them googling 'Workflow and Tools' over it.

  5. The edit gave your question visibility. It received 5 more upvotes after I edited your question, and now it's on the radar because now it's easy to search for.

6 grammar nazi
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  1. Not everyone who visits the question is going to want narrow answers: They may want good links to W3Schools. They may not know what W3Schools is. However, you'll notice that even removing that clause didn't lead to a deluge of 'Use W3Schools' answers, did it? That's because Stack Overflow rewards complete answers. It's more of a feeling than an outright scientific truth, but I've seen time and again that the more complete an answer is, the more upvotes it gets. You'll notice only one person put in a W3Schools link, and while it doesn't help you, it's potentially helpful to someone else stumbling on the question, and if the community thinks it's a good answer, they'll vote it up. If not, then there's really nothing for you to worry about.

  2. You asked about 9 questions in a one question answer. It really didn't have a theme, so I tried to break the question into some logical sections so that someone reading it wouldn't have a hard time following it. A better looking question gets better answers. Again, not a scientific truth, just something I've seen from being around here.

  3. I removed the 'tips and tricks' because that's awfully close to a List of X question, and those are not welcome on Stack Overflow. I didn't want your question closed by someone because it looked like a List of X question.

  4. Finally, I edited the question so that it would stand the test of time. The smileys and 'hi' and the school-room touch are cute, but they degrade the quality of the encyclopedic nature of the question. If someone comes from Google, they really don't care that you are thanking people, or that you put a smiley, or that you were being cute; they really just want a good answer to their question. That's the litmus test for a good question: Pageviews and how 'Googleable' it is. "How do I get started with HTML5' is very googleable -- that's a question I can see someone googling. I can't, however, see them googling 'Workflow and Tools' over it.

  5. The edit gave your question visibility. It received 5 more upvotes after I edited your question, and now it's on the radar because now it's easilyeasy to search for.

  1. Not everyone who visits the question is going to want narrow answers: They may want good links to W3Schools. They may not know what W3Schools is. However, you'll notice that even removing that clause didn't lead to a deluge of 'Use W3Schools' answers, did it? That's because Stack Overflow rewards complete answers. It's more of a feeling than an outright scientific truth, but I've seen time and again that the more complete an answer is, the more upvotes it gets. You'll notice only one person put in a W3Schools link, and while it doesn't help you, it's potentially helpful to someone else stumbling on the question, and if the community thinks it's a good answer, they'll vote it up. If not, then there's really nothing for you to worry about.

  2. You asked about 9 questions in a one question answer. It really didn't have a theme, so I tried to break the question into some logical sections so that someone reading it wouldn't have a hard time following it. A better looking question gets better answers. Again, not a scientific truth, just something I've seen from being around here.

  3. I removed the 'tips and tricks' because that's awfully close to a List of X question, and those are not welcome on Stack Overflow. I didn't want your question closed by someone because it looked like a List of X question.

  4. Finally, I edited the question so that it would stand the test of time. The smileys and 'hi' and the school-room touch are cute, but they degrade the quality of the encyclopedic nature of the question. If someone comes from Google, they really don't care that you are thanking people, or that you put a smiley, or that you were being cute; they really just want a good answer to their question. That's the litmus test for a good question: Pageviews and how 'Googleable' it is. "How do I get started with HTML5' is very googleable -- that's a question I can see someone googling. I can't, however, see them googling 'Workflow and Tools' over it.

  5. The edit gave your question visibility. It received 5 more upvotes after I edited your question, and now it's on the radar because it's easily to search for.

  1. Not everyone who visits the question is going to want narrow answers: They may want good links to W3Schools. They may not know what W3Schools is. However, you'll notice that even removing that clause didn't lead to a deluge of 'Use W3Schools' answers, did it? That's because Stack Overflow rewards complete answers. It's more of a feeling than an outright scientific truth, but I've seen time and again that the more complete an answer is, the more upvotes it gets. You'll notice only one person put in a W3Schools link, and while it doesn't help you, it's potentially helpful to someone else stumbling on the question, and if the community thinks it's a good answer, they'll vote it up. If not, then there's really nothing for you to worry about.

  2. You asked about 9 questions in a one question answer. It really didn't have a theme, so I tried to break the question into some logical sections so that someone reading it wouldn't have a hard time following it. A better looking question gets better answers. Again, not a scientific truth, just something I've seen from being around here.

  3. I removed the 'tips and tricks' because that's awfully close to a List of X question, and those are not welcome on Stack Overflow. I didn't want your question closed by someone because it looked like a List of X question.

  4. Finally, I edited the question so that it would stand the test of time. The smileys and 'hi' and the school-room touch are cute, but they degrade the quality of the encyclopedic nature of the question. If someone comes from Google, they really don't care that you are thanking people, or that you put a smiley, or that you were being cute; they really just want a good answer to their question. That's the litmus test for a good question: Pageviews and how 'Googleable' it is. "How do I get started with HTML5' is very googleable -- that's a question I can see someone googling. I can't, however, see them googling 'Workflow and Tools' over it.

  5. The edit gave your question visibility. It received 5 more upvotes after I edited your question, and now it's on the radar because now it's easy to search for.

5 Rollback to Revision 3
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  1. Not everyone who visits the question is going to want narrow answers: They may want good links to W3Schools. They may not know what W3Schools is. However, you'll notice that even removing that clause didn't lead to a deluge of 'Use W3Schools' answers, did it? That's because Stack Overflow rewards complete answers. It's more of a feeling than an outright scientific truth, but I've seen time and again that the more complete an answer is, the more upvotes it gets. You'll notice only one person put in a W3Schools link, and while it doesn't help you, it's potentially helpful to someone else stumbling on the question, and if the community thinks it's a good answer, they'll vote it up. If not, then there's really nothing for you to worry about.

  2. You asked about 9 questions in a one question answer. It really didn't have a theme, so I tried to break the question into some logical sections so that someone reading it wouldn't have a hard time following it. A better looking question gets better answers. Again, not a scientific truth, just something I've seen from being around here.

  3. I removed the 'tips and tricks' because that's awfully close to a List of X question, and those are not welcome on Stack Overflow. I didn't want your question closed by someone because it looked like a List of X question.

  4. Finally, I edited the question so that it would stand the test of time. The smileys and 'hi' and the school-room touch are cute, but they degrade the quality of the encyclopedic nature of the question. If someone comes from Google, they really don't care that you are thanking people, or that you put a smiley, or that you were being cute; they really just want a good answer to their question. That's the litmus test for a good question: Pageviews and how 'Googleable' it is. "How do I get started with HTML5' is very googleable -- that's a question I can see someone googling. I can't, however, see them googling 'Workflow and Tools' over it.

  5. The edit gave your question visibility. It received 5 more upvotesIt received 5 more upvotes after I edited your question, and now it's on the radar because it's easily to search for.

  1. Not everyone who visits the question is going to want narrow answers: They may want good links to W3Schools. They may not know what W3Schools is. However, you'll notice that even removing that clause didn't lead to a deluge of 'Use W3Schools' answers, did it? That's because Stack Overflow rewards complete answers. It's more of a feeling than an outright scientific truth, but I've seen time and again that the more complete an answer is, the more upvotes it gets. You'll notice only one person put in a W3Schools link, and while it doesn't help you, it's potentially helpful to someone else stumbling on the question, and if the community thinks it's a good answer, they'll vote it up. If not, then there's really nothing for you to worry about.

  2. You asked about 9 questions in a one question answer. It really didn't have a theme, so I tried to break the question into some logical sections so that someone reading it wouldn't have a hard time following it. A better looking question gets better answers. Again, not a scientific truth, just something I've seen from being around here.

  3. I removed the 'tips and tricks' because that's awfully close to a List of X question, and those are not welcome on Stack Overflow. I didn't want your question closed by someone because it looked like a List of X question.

  4. Finally, I edited the question so that it would stand the test of time. The smileys and 'hi' and the school-room touch are cute, but they degrade the quality of the encyclopedic nature of the question. If someone comes from Google, they really don't care that you are thanking people, or that you put a smiley, or that you were being cute; they really just want a good answer to their question. That's the litmus test for a good question: Pageviews and how 'Googleable' it is. "How do I get started with HTML5' is very googleable -- that's a question I can see someone googling. I can't, however, see them googling 'Workflow and Tools' over it.

  5. The edit gave your question visibility. It received 5 more upvotes after I edited your question, and now it's on the radar because it's easily to search for.

  1. Not everyone who visits the question is going to want narrow answers: They may want good links to W3Schools. They may not know what W3Schools is. However, you'll notice that even removing that clause didn't lead to a deluge of 'Use W3Schools' answers, did it? That's because Stack Overflow rewards complete answers. It's more of a feeling than an outright scientific truth, but I've seen time and again that the more complete an answer is, the more upvotes it gets. You'll notice only one person put in a W3Schools link, and while it doesn't help you, it's potentially helpful to someone else stumbling on the question, and if the community thinks it's a good answer, they'll vote it up. If not, then there's really nothing for you to worry about.

  2. You asked about 9 questions in a one question answer. It really didn't have a theme, so I tried to break the question into some logical sections so that someone reading it wouldn't have a hard time following it. A better looking question gets better answers. Again, not a scientific truth, just something I've seen from being around here.

  3. I removed the 'tips and tricks' because that's awfully close to a List of X question, and those are not welcome on Stack Overflow. I didn't want your question closed by someone because it looked like a List of X question.

  4. Finally, I edited the question so that it would stand the test of time. The smileys and 'hi' and the school-room touch are cute, but they degrade the quality of the encyclopedic nature of the question. If someone comes from Google, they really don't care that you are thanking people, or that you put a smiley, or that you were being cute; they really just want a good answer to their question. That's the litmus test for a good question: Pageviews and how 'Googleable' it is. "How do I get started with HTML5' is very googleable -- that's a question I can see someone googling. I can't, however, see them googling 'Workflow and Tools' over it.

  5. The edit gave your question visibility. It received 5 more upvotes after I edited your question, and now it's on the radar because it's easily to search for.

4 added 12 characters in body
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3 added 227 characters in body
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2 added 2 characters in body; deleted 4 characters in body
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