10

For example, on this change (change #3) says edited tags but shows no changes. What exactly was changed, and why was it done a year after the question was asked? Is there a way to see the specific change, like how answers have side-by-side revision history view?

2
  • @yoda Is there a way for us (end-user) to determine that reason or other similar revisions without asking on meta?
    – JBurace
    May 29 '12 at 22:12
  • well, if you're on meta reasonably often, you'll piece things together on your own (or simply learn to not ask)... but otherwise, no. May 29 '12 at 22:13
11

Blank revisions don't usually occur, but there's three situations I can think of that result in one.

  1. The user added a tag that was pruned by the system or destroyed by a developer later on. This is most likely what happened there.

  2. The user reverted his own edits within the grace period. Usually this results in the revision being deleted, but it doesn't always happen, and maybe this revision is from before this feature was introduced.

  3. The post could have had other revisions that were deleted. This is probably not the case, since this is a developer-only function and rarely used. Here's an example of a deleted revision that contained a password.

2
  • 1
    There is no diff shown for the revisions deleted via the 3rd option. They don't appear the same as a blank revision.
    – Adam Lear StaffMod
    May 30 '12 at 3:19
  • @AnnaLear I know. I meant that an intermediate revision could have changed something, but the revisions before and after that are the same (i.e. a rollback), and they weren't deleted.
    – a cat
    May 30 '12 at 6:39
3

Depending on in you are looking at the raw markdown or rendered markdown, in the latter, an HTML comment would appear to be a blank edit because the HTML comment is not rendered but still constitutes as an edit.

You can see these differences here -


Rendered mardown -

   

Raw mardown -

                     

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