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There's a number of subfields that have a stackexchange site of their own by now, such as linguistics, statistics, computer science, etc. It also appears that questions with certain tags are very likely to be migrated to some field-specific site and/or get a comment proposing to ask this question again on the said site. For example: [machine-learning] or [classification] or [statistics] suggest that the question is suitable for http://stats.stackexchange.com, [linguistics] or [nlp] often point to http://linguistics.stackexchange.com, [algorithm] or [complexity] may indicate relevance to http://cs.stackexchange.com or https://cstheory.stackexchange.com/, etc.

The problem, however, is that many users are not aware of these specific stackexchange sites or have trouble identifying the one they are looking for. Do you think it would make sense to inform the author of the existence/relevance of these resources when they have done the tagging or, possibly, based on the body of the question same as suggested tags?

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    The problem is that choosing the tags is the last thing you usually do when composing a question, and most people will just ignore the hints to other sites and just post it.
    – yannis
    Oct 17 '12 at 15:08
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  • @YannisRizos, it depends on the author. Personally, I always read through whatever I am about to post before hitting the submit button. And I also think that the title and body of the question can be used.\
    – Qnan
    Oct 17 '12 at 15:11
  • If you actually read through everything, then a simple enough solution would be to add the related sites on the tags' excerpts and wikis.
    – yannis
    Oct 17 '12 at 15:12
  • I see someone already asked it, though.
    – Qnan
    Oct 17 '12 at 15:12
  • Given the problems we've had with bad migrations, do we really want to further encourage the process?
    – user102937
    Oct 17 '12 at 15:49
  • @RobertHarvey no idea. But it does seem to me that people post things on StackOverflow just because it's the best-known one. And I guess most bad migrations result from the question being misunderstood, so there's hope that the author would understand their question somewhat better.
    – Qnan
    Oct 17 '12 at 16:07
  • @RobertHarvey this also raises another matter: some questions are relevant to more than one of the sites. E.g. cs and cstheory are quite closely related. And I expect that the more sites appear, the more correlation there will be. In such cases, should the question be asked on both relevant sites? Should the two instances of the question reference each other? Do all these separate sites actually make sense or are they just a different (obligatory and mutually exclusive) kind of tag?
    – Qnan
    Oct 17 '12 at 16:12
  • Cross-posting is generally discouraged. We suggest that users find the site that is most relevant to their question.
    – user102937
    Oct 17 '12 at 16:57