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I thought I'd tackle a few close vote reviews. I was presented with a question about Wordpress running out of memory (sorry the actual question is now lost, though I remember it had 10 upvotes) and the review asked whether it should be closed as Not constructive. I clicked close, since it was clearly a Duplicate (and a high rep user had already pointed it out as a dup of this in the comments).

I expected to be presented with the Close Reason dialogue, but instead I got an automated complaint that I'd failed a test, and that I should "pay attention". Was I unreasonable in thinking the UI should behave as it does when a real close review is presented?

Put another way, if my close reason is different to the one suggested, should I skip rather than cast a differing close vote, even though I would have cast that vote in "real life"?

marked as duplicate by ben is uǝq backwards, Hugo Dozois, Shog9 May 10 '13 at 22:29

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  • Thanks @Ben - that was from just earlier today! Great minds, etc. Yes, that looks like a dup. – halfer May 10 '13 at 21:59
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    FWIW, the duplicate scenario is one where close audits kinda fall apart at the moment. I've failed them for the exact same reason. – Shog9 May 10 '13 at 22:29
  • @Shog: okay, thanks. Is there any consequence to failing them? – halfer May 10 '13 at 23:44
  • You could end up finding your ability to review blocked for a period of time, @halfer. Right now, that's somewhat less likely to happen in response to close/reopen audits than it is for other types of review audits, and generally-speaking if you're reviewing judiciously it's not something you should need to be too worried about. – Shog9 May 10 '13 at 23:46
  • Well, if it blocks me based on this, I shall stop reviewing! Still, if I persist tackling close votes, perhaps now at least I know where the bugs and pitfalls are, so it is less likely to happen again. – halfer May 10 '13 at 23:48

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