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I was wandering around the "help" and, noticed these at the bottom left:

Answering

What does it mean when an answer is "accepted"?

Why are answers no longer being accepted from my account?

Now, it's not a biggie, and there are quotation marks around "accepted", but why leave it open to confusion? Why not use the more direct "Why are answers from my account being rejected?", and the same extended to the messages people actually see?

Why passivity over directivity, er, directness?

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    Because the ban message is “Sorry, we are no longer accepting questions/answers from this account”. "Accept" is the keyword here, and somehow it is also used in accepting answers in general. – Antony Jul 8 '13 at 15:59
  • The question was "why the passivity". You're saying the answer is "because it is passive"? I'm picky, but it does not look professional to have those two things together on the help page. Perhaps they "mix-up" the help (the first is "pinned") so maybe I shouldn't worry. – Bill Woodger Jul 8 '13 at 16:03
  • I am saying the word "accept" being the word in common in both scenarios. I didn't mention specifically about "passivity", just that you cannot simply replace "no longer being accepted" with "rejected" without changing the ban message. – Antony Jul 8 '13 at 16:07
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    The likelihood of someone who is question-banned knowing what accepting answers (using the checkmark) means is pretty close to zero anyway. Welcome to the English language. – Robert Harvey Jul 8 '13 at 16:12
  • The passive answer is technically correct, though; it's not rejecting something, it's not accepting something. :) – Joe Jul 8 '13 at 16:13
  • OK. "Accept" is pretty central to describing how this whole thing works. So why use "Accept" for something else within the same system. There are alternatives, even passive ones. Why "overload" "accept"? – Bill Woodger Jul 8 '13 at 16:43
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    It is not only the "question-banned" who might be looking at the help (it could be someone who is unclear how to Accept an answer). English always has many ways to say the same thing, so you choose something to avoid confusion, don't you? If you believe no-one will ever read (or be able to understand) something you either clarify or remove it. – Bill Woodger Jul 8 '13 at 16:45
  • I agree that, as pointed out, this seems strange and potentially confusing, but I think it's only the juxtaposition that's causing that. If the "not accepting answers from my account" item was moved elsewhere, I don't think this would be a problem. On the other hand, I'm not sure what a more appropriate place would be. – Josh Caswell Jul 8 '13 at 18:59

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