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This question already has an answer here:

The description of the "not an answer" flag states:

This was posted as an answer, but it does not attempt to answer the question. It should possibly be an edit, a comment, another question, or deleted altogether.

If an answer was marked as accepted, that practically proves that the given answer did help the asker solve the problem.

So, should it even be possible to flag accepted answers as "not an answer"? If I'm wrong, please give me an example or a constructed scenario of a situation, where this is appropriate.

marked as duplicate by gnat, hims056, Tobias Kienzler, Doorknob, Hugo Dozois Jul 19 '13 at 15:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    please give some examples of situations where this is appropriate. The real examples of where it might be appropriate are most likely going to be deleted already so will be very difficult to find unless you know of a specific case. – psubsee2003 Jul 19 '13 at 11:53
  • @psubsee2003 then give me some constructed scenario. – Lukas Knuth Jul 19 '13 at 11:54
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    @psubsee2003 Here is a recent example that I saw in the review queue. The answer is terrible but it was the OP who posted it and accepted it -- stackoverflow.com/questions/13504214/… – Taryn Jul 19 '13 at 11:54
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    Scenario- OP: I want to do XYZ.. Answer: Try to use jQuery. Answer accepted!!! Flag it. – hims056 Jul 19 '13 at 11:56
  • @LukasKnuth I think the scenarios where you want to flag an accepted answer will be rare, but bluefeet's example is an excellent one. – psubsee2003 Jul 19 '13 at 11:57
  • @bluefeet, you should post that as an answer (and include snippet from that "answer" in your post since that "answer" would probably be deleted soon). – Old Checkmark Jul 19 '13 at 12:56
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You make a good argument, but there isn't a compelling enough case to block the use of this flag altogether for accepted answers.

Flags don't do anything automatically, they're raised to the attention of a human exception handler. The only way that any action will be taken is if that human decides that your flag is valid.

Consider it this way: if we made it impossible to flag accepted answers as "not an answer", what would we do in those rare edge cases where the flag might need to be raised? Conversely, if we leave it like it is, the worst that can happen is that some invalid flags get raised and have to be dismissed. Not a big deal.

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