6

Questions concerning problems with code you've written must describe the specific problem — and include valid code to reproduce it — in the question itself. See SSCCE.org for guidance.


Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist

These two seem the same to me: they don't describe what they've done or the problem well. I seem to use them interchangeably, depending on what the other people think. I think they're definitely both valid, so what is the difference?

closed as off-topic by Laurel, PeterJ, Ward, Nathan Tuggy, PolyGeo Jan 11 at 3:34

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "The problem described here can no longer be reproduced. Changes to the system or to the circumstances affecting the asker have rendered it obsolete. If you encounter a similar problem, please post a new question." – Laurel, PeterJ, Ward, PolyGeo
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • I think the first one is meant for situations where OPs just throw 100 lines of code at you, whereas the second is for situations where the OP is basically saying "help me my code is broken". That said, there's an argument to consolidate the first one into the second. – waiwai933 Aug 8 '13 at 9:25
  • "they don't describe what they've done or the problem well." Bottom reason, Top reason – George Duckett Aug 8 '13 at 9:26
  • 5
    "Unclear what you're asking" is another one you could throw in here. It is also very similar to both of these. One could argue, in fact, that it encompasses both of these. – Cody Gray Aug 8 '13 at 9:27
  • 1
    It doesn't work vs. Gimmeh teh codez – Won't Aug 8 '13 at 16:20
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Questions concerning problems with code you've written must describe the specific problem — and include valid code to reproduce it — in the question itself. See SSCCE.org for guidance.

I use this when

  • The OP has a specific problem but hasn't shown any of the relevant code
  • The code they've shown is not relevant, doesn't demonstrate the problem, or there's too much of it

Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist

I use this when

  • The OP doesn't have a well-defined problem and hasn't written any code yet
  • Homework questions where they just post their given assignment and expect someone to do it for them
  • "I want to do X, where should I start?" (where X is specific enough that it can't be closed as too broad)
  • +1 I also use the "minimal understanding" reason in cases when 1. RTFM or 2. OP has absolutely no idea what he is doing. – H2CO3 Aug 8 '13 at 10:39
  • Thanks for this, this seems to make sense. – It'sNotALie. Aug 8 '13 at 11:32
  • I...I don't think that what Juhana has actually posted here is anything like what @H2CO3 interprets it to say. "RTFM" is not a valid reason to close a question. It's a reason you answer it once with a well-written canonical-style answer, and then close all future questions as duplicates of that original one. And if "OP has absolutely no idea what he is doing" was a reason to close a question, we wouldn't have any questions. You don't ask a question if you know what you're doing. – Cody Gray Aug 8 '13 at 11:55
  • @CodyGray The "minimal understanding" means that "I've tried solving this myself, and I've done my best, yet I was unable to come to a solution". RTFM strictly contradicts that. Also, I feel that "You don't ask a question if you know what you're doing" is a bit of an exaggeration. What I meant by "OP has no idea what he is doing" is something like the guy yesterday who tried to run raw C source text as a shell script. That's unacceptable on Stack Overflow as well. – H2CO3 Aug 8 '13 at 12:00
  • I can't decide if I do or don't want to live in this world where it is unacceptable to not know what you're doing. But it certainly is not the real world. – Cody Gray Aug 8 '13 at 12:02
  • @CodyGray I interpret "not knowing what you're doing" something like "I want to make a social network where you use facial recognition to send SMS. It must be yellow. How can I do it with jQuery?" i.e. the the question can't be answered because the OP doesn't know what they're doing (not the other way around). Others may have different standards. – JJJ Aug 8 '13 at 12:58
  • Yeah, that makes sense. I consider that "unclear what you're asking", or "question does not make sense". Not "you are too stupid to be helped". – Cody Gray Aug 8 '13 at 13:00

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