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In the review queue for Suggested Edits, I bumped into this edit. There is a newly registered user with only 1 reputation that suggests removing the code in the answer because of "violation of the Florida Atlantic University Honor Code" (link and description as given by the user who suggested the edit).

I really have no idea of what I should do with this edit. In one way, I'm thinking "I don't really know if this user knows what he is talking about or if he just wants to be evil", but I am also thinking "Violation of a University Honor Code sounds like heavy stuff, especially considering that five page long PDF-document".

What to do about an edit like this?

I don't know what others will do, but I'm gonna click the Skip button for now.

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    Any agreement between two parties cannot force a third party to comply. We are said third party and we are not held to their honor code – Richard Tingle Sep 29 '13 at 21:59
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    Such requests should be done in private with the team, I remember cases when code was removed after formal request has been submitted. But not like this, such suggestions should be rejected and even edits rolled back unless done by official Stack Exchange employee. (Who will usually erase the original revision itself leaving no trace of the code) – ShaWiz Sep 29 '13 at 22:01
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    I think that rejection was justified. If the user really needed to specify this (and couldn't wait to earn commenting privileges), he/she could've sent a support email. – Jamal Sep 29 '13 at 22:02
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    @sha that would make a fine answer – Pëkka Sep 29 '13 at 22:07
  • Yes, please post something as an answer at least. I can't mark comments as "Accepted as an answer". I would like to accept the comment by @ShaWizDowArd . considering posting a feature-request – Simon Forsberg Sep 29 '13 at 22:09
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    I left a comment to the editor, pointing him to here. In your answer, please include instructions he/she can follow to get that question deleted if it qualifies. – flodel Sep 29 '13 at 22:11
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    And I would assume the problem with any academic integrity here is (possibly) a student asking for help with their coursework. At which point it's of course nonsensical to suggest that the answer given violates the rules. – Bart Sep 29 '13 at 22:12
  • I agree fully with @ShaWizDowArd. Additionally, a quick read through the, not-exactly-final, Honor Code suggests that somebody have turned in the solution verbatim and got caught. However, that somebody would then be in violation for failing to submit that the code was obtained at SO. I can't really see why the team would go along in that case, even if a formal request was made. – user213634 Sep 29 '13 at 22:25
  • @per and Simon - done. :) – ShaWiz Sep 29 '13 at 22:27
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    No one has mentioned it, but this same editor tried to do the same edit twice. The linked suggested edit was the 2nd attempt. I think someone needs to keep an eye on this post. – psubsee2003 Sep 30 '13 at 0:38
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    I wonder if it is the asker (using a different profile) editing the post so he does't get caught for cheating??? – psubsee2003 Sep 30 '13 at 0:40
  • @psubsee2003 it was actually an attempt to remove the code from the question, as well. Not sure it would be the asker, either, as there doesn't seem to have been an attempt to remove the code from their other, obviously homework, question. – Carl Veazey Sep 30 '13 at 2:33
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    Btw: Nuke letter. And watch out that noone edits out the code from some question when doing this ;) – Johannes Kuhn Sep 30 '13 at 6:54
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Such requests should be done in private with the team, not like this.

Such suggestions should be rejected and even edits rolled back unless done by official Stack Exchange employee. (Who will usually erase the original revision itself leaving no trace of the code)

If there is really copyright violations, DMCA request should be submitted directly to the team as described in the terms of service in section 15, "Copyright Policy".

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    Given the particular linked document I would assume the problem here is one of academic integrity, and not so much one of copyright. But well, it doesn't really change the answer apart from the DMCA request. :) – Bart Sep 29 '13 at 22:29
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    Well as the person who answered the question I guess I have been dragged into this. This was quite awhile ago but I don't remember the user asking the question identifying this as homework. While I, like everyone else, struggle with how much help to offer on homework, I really don't give a flip about the Florida Atlantic University Honor Code. I don't go to school there. Frankly the notion that the school has domain over a "guess the letter" game is absurd on its face. This is between the questioner and his school and has nothing at all to do with Stackoverflow or anyone else. – Duck Sep 29 '13 at 23:02
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    I would tend to agree with @Duck - if the school wants to do something to their student for trying to ask for help, so be it. But you can't run around saying that anything that helps with homework needs to be nuked. – Undo Sep 29 '13 at 23:03
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    @Duck agreed, but the university has the right to submit a request - most likey rejected, but still... :) – ShaWiz Sep 30 '13 at 6:43

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