3

Where, especially on what stackexchange site, should I ask C# class design questions?

What I want to know:

I want to know what possibilities exist, to design an entity class and how to arrange its properties.

What the question should create for me and others:

  1. The result should be several answers of possibilities how to arrange the properties of an entity. e.g. by:
    • alphabetically
    • type (int, bool, ..)
    • security level (public, protected, ..)
  2. Short self experienced/known Pros and Cons of the listed possibilities.

In general, I want to create a small collection of replies with self experienced Pros and Cons and objective statements to the stated possibility.

What I do not want:

As we know, we do not want to have here on stackexchange subjective questions, which ignite endless subjective discussions. I am aware to avoid such form of questioning and thats why I am here trying to formulate what I do not know at the moment and what I want to create here on stackexchange for me and others with a possible question.

General:

First thing, I wanted to write the question here on meta.stackoverflow, then on codereview, then on programmers, then on meta.programmers, but I am nonetheless not sure.

Please give me answers, where the right place is!

Edit 1
The discussion glid a little bit towards semantics of phrasing , but we found an acceptable conclusion to "Where to ask C# class design question" as well as got the résumé what to put on meta and what to put to the parent site!

6
  • I'd suggest Programmers; that's where to ask design questions. programmers.stackexchange.com/about
    – Doorknob
    Oct 1, 2013 at 12:31
  • 5
    @Doorknob - This appears to be an overly broad design question - this would get rejected on Programmers, I fear.
    – Oded
    Oct 1, 2013 at 12:35
  • 2
    Once you've actually written the class, take it to Code Review Oct 1, 2013 at 12:52
  • 1
    @Florian no, that's exactly what Code Review is for. "This code is working, is there a better way to do this?" Doesn't need to be a discussion, just like a regular code review. Oct 1, 2013 at 13:15
  • 1
    From the Code Review "About" page: "Ask about [t]he quality of your working code with regards to: Best practices and design pattern usage, Security issues, Performance, Correctness in unanticipated cases." If you have working code and want it evaluated, CR is where to ask. Oct 1, 2013 at 13:41
  • related (duplicate?): Which computer science / programming Stack Exchange do I post in?
    – gnat
    Oct 1, 2013 at 15:57

2 Answers 2

7

TL;DR

You're not really looking for discussion.


Your actual question and what you're looking for are somewhat at odds.

I want to know what possibilities exist, to design an entity class and how to arrange its properties.

Okay, so you want to design an entity class and logically arrange its properties.

But then:

What the question should create for me and others:

The result should be several answers of possibilities how to arrange the properties of an entity.

DANGER DANGER DANGER. "Several answers of possibilities" already smells subjective and discussion based. But is that really what you want? You say you're looking for possibilities, but it sounds to me what you're really asking is "does this code make sense? Should it be structured in a different way?" If that is indeed the case, and you have a working, functional piece of code that you want evaluated, then Code Review is the place for you. From the Code Review About page:

Ask about...

The quality of your working code with regards to:

  • Best practices and design pattern usage
  • Security issues
  • Performance
  • Correctness in unanticipated cases

So, your question might look like this:


I have this class, which serves to do [x, y, and z]:

Class myClass
{
    // properties
    // ctor
    // methods, etc
}

I have [these concerns] about methods [foo and bar]. Should I be doing [baz] instead?


So I think the problem is that you think you want discussion, when really you want evaluation. If you still have doubts, you can always ask whether your question is on-topic on meta Code Review.

1
  • 1
    If I am understanding you correctly, it's a question of the semantics of phrasing of the question, but your question will still be answered. But you're right, asking on meta.codereview first is not a bad idea either. Oct 1, 2013 at 15:10
5

Meta sites are for discussing their parent sites - not for "meta" discussions of the topics.

So actual, real, subject matter questions never go to a meta site.


As for this question:

I want to create a small collection of replies with self experienced Pros and Cons

That goes against the idea of questions that have correct, verifiable answers. As a community, we have found that questions asking for lists are a poor fit for our Q&A format.

This is a very open-ended question and very broad (how many ways? there is an infinite number of ways.) - we expect questions to be focused and answerable, which the above isn't.

As such - Stack Exchange sites are not the place for such questions.

1
  • 2
    @FlorianIsopp - Correct. It is not a suitable question for Stack Exchange sites. It is too open-ended, too open to discussion, disagreement and opinion. If you could focus it (offer criteria by which a certain design is to be judged and offer your attempts to resolve the issues), that would be a different matter.
    – Oded
    Oct 1, 2013 at 13:08

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .