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I feel some users don't read edits before accepting or rejecting them. This has been a problem for a while now, but surely established users should know what they're doing, right?

Although the edit is likely to be approved overall, does anyone have any reason why Roman would see an issue with this edit - as far as I can tell this is a vital edit to the question. Anything else I should have done to improve the edit quality?

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  • 3
    I really wouldn't worry unless it actually is rejected. This is after all why multiple people vote on these things Oct 4, 2013 at 12:50
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    I understand, but this seems to happen all too much. I admit, some edits are more minor than others, I just feel like there should be an appeal process and possibly (a small) loss of rep for extended invalid reviews Oct 4, 2013 at 12:51
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    It is nice to know at least one person actually looks at these things though Oct 4, 2013 at 12:52
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    I find it the best way to learn what is/isn't accepted Oct 4, 2013 at 12:53
  • Ultimately this is how the community decides what is and isnt a valid suggested edit. I wouldn't want to take away Romans voice even if I disagree in this case Oct 4, 2013 at 12:54
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    Some people are more strict with reviewing than others - that's why it's a vote, not a single person call. Result of this vote says "good edit, not perfect" - pretty valid result, nobody is perfect ;)
    – Mołot
    Oct 4, 2013 at 12:54
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    Of course if Roman is actually just a robo reviewer then the audits will catch him Oct 4, 2013 at 12:54
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    I find this very similar to the review history of someone I gave an answer on why they might have been reviewed banned. There appears to be a misunderstanding amongst some reviewers as to what "Too Minor" actually means. And the only way to fix it is through education (unsure how though) Oct 4, 2013 at 13:09
  • @psubsee2003 It's been an issue since the very start of suggested edits being in existence. Some people just don't think there should be such a thing as "too minor", and never reject anything for that reason, others have very limited cases they consider too minor, others very wide, etc. It's admittedly one of the more subjective rejection reasons there.
    – Servy
    Oct 4, 2013 at 14:34

3 Answers 3

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In your case, the edit was ultimately approved. Nothing to worry about.

However, I can see why Roman would have rejected it - unless you really look hard at it, it looks an awful lot like you changed a bunch of code. I probably would have rejected it for the same thing.

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    I'd suggest that you should always click onto both the 'markdown' and 'rendered output' tabs when looking at big, confusing code changes like this. If you click onto the 'markdown' section of the linked edit, it's immediately obvious that only formatting has been changed. In this case, at least, you absolutely have the tools available to avoid rejecting erroneously.
    – Mark Amery
    Oct 4, 2013 at 13:35
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    @MarkAmery I'm trying to put myself in Roman's shoes.
    – Undo
    Oct 4, 2013 at 13:41
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Well, basic reason for multiple votes is minimizing personal errors and trying to make here a community site.

A single person may think different, but if a lot of people agree, then it is accepted; if they disagree, then it is rejected. That is what make here a great community site. Do not forget, a lot of things argued in here,in meta, and many things changed during time. Things welcome in this community once may became not-welcome anymore.

For the rejection reason, I probably wish to argue too, since this is not a minor edit. In fact it was a great edit to style the code and make it readable. If I come across with your edit; I will either accept it or reject it and vote for question closure with unclear what you are asking because it is really hard to read the question.

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Unless I am missing something: What you link to as this edit is still only code formatting.

Okay, it's a lot of code. But maybe Roman's thought was: Why bother 3 reviewers with that, while surely someone with edit privileges would have made that edit too when running into that question, without the need to bother 3 reviewers? Also, the title is horrible too, so it's not like there wasn't anything else to fix.

(I would agree with such thought and might have rejected too, but I don't review.)

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    I would tend to say that code formatting is a large enough problem to warrant a suggested edit.
    – Undo
    Oct 4, 2013 at 14:07
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    @undo, I'd actually explain to the author how to fix it and let the voting do the rest. But well... (Also, I'd vote to close as "too localized" but that has gone? I'm getting old!)
    – Arjan
    Oct 4, 2013 at 14:09
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    The edit turns a completely unreadable post into a relatively understandable one. That's exactly what edits are there for. How much work it took the editor to do that isn't particularly relevant; it's the value added to the post. Sometimes spending 2 seconds to format code as code can add a lot of value. It's also not like he skipped editing any other content; he fixed everything there was to fix. There's no way this is too minor.
    – Servy
    Oct 4, 2013 at 14:22
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    @Servy, I disagree about editing all there is, as the title is totally non-descriptive. And indeed, I don't care about how much work it is for the editor, but for the reviewers. It's not a 2 seconds edit, it's the start of a process that involves at least 3 others. To me, if I were reviewing, just formatting the code is too minor. Maybe Roman was thinking the same.
    – Arjan
    Oct 4, 2013 at 14:40
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    @Arjan You're correct, it will likely take the reviewers more than 2 seconds to review the content. I never said otherwise. I said that the 2 seconds the editor spend editing the post adds enough value to make it worth it. It's worth the 10 seconds of 3-5 reviewers' time to review this edit because it really does add that much value. If you want to improve it to improve the title, by all means, go ahead. The edit is clearly a substantial improvement to the post. Go look at the first revision and try to tell me you could comprehend what's going on there.
    – Servy
    Oct 4, 2013 at 14:49
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    @Servy, sure I agree that the edit was an improvement. But to me (and maybe to Roman too), if I were reviewing, it would just not be worth putting it into the review queue. There's many others with edit privileges who can make the same edit without the need for the review process: no need for a suggested edit 4 minutes after the original post, I'd say. (That aside, I'd even prefer a Stack Overflow without questions like that. In this specific case, where the author didn't even care about formatting their too-localized question, voting down is even better than editing, says grumpy me...)
    – Arjan
    Oct 4, 2013 at 14:59
  • @Arjan Yes, that post should be downvoted and closed in my opinion, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't edit it. Basically any edit anywhere can be made by a 2k user instead, by that logic every single suggested edit ever is too minor. If the post isn't really much better after the edit then it's potentially too minor. That's not the case here. The post is dramatically better than it was before. It still has problems (that can't be fixed from editing) but it's still a lot better. If this is too minor than most everything in the queue is too minor, as this is a pretty substantial edit.
    – Servy
    Oct 4, 2013 at 15:02
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    @Servy, "by that logic every single suggested edit ever is too minor" -- unless the suggested edits were introduced to allow people to fix things that would otherwise not be fixed within a reasonable amount of time?
    – Arjan
    Oct 4, 2013 at 15:11

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