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I was just reading this question and thinking about potentially better ways to improve on the situation presented there

So - we take as a given that we want to discourage people from making poor questions. People who make poor questions and get immediate answers are actually getting positive feedback. People who give immediate answers to poor questions and then get accepted/upvoted are getting positive feedback. The primary issue driving the linked question is that the "rapid answer" technique gets an answer in there (and upvoted/accepted) before the close process can get its boots on. The primary issue with the solution suggested is that turning downvotes into close votes has some serious negative implications.

How about making question closing retroactive (for certain close reasons)? Don't destroy the answers, but cause them to give no rep while the question is closed, and possibly hide them. That eliminates the drive to answer questions that are so poor that they're sure to get closed, and thus cuts down significantly on the benefits of posting low-quality questions seeking immediate answers. It's still just as hard to close them in the first place, and if the OP (or other editing authority) fixes the question enough to reopen it, the answers come back.

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    Been asked a number of times, but so far this is the closest I've found to a dupe. – Servy Nov 1 '13 at 17:01
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    @Servy - it may be lawyering, but I'll note that that's in reference to the questions, rather than the answers, and addressing a somewhat different part of the motivation chain. – Ben Barden Nov 1 '13 at 17:11
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    Which is why I didn't propose it as a dupe, but rather as a related question. Much of the answer would apply to your question, even if the question itself isn't a duplicate. – Servy Nov 1 '13 at 17:17
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    @Servy still - if it is the case both that closed non-dupe questions are inevitably deleted (if not reopened) and duplicate questions are, by and large, actually considered to be good things, then there's not a whole lot of reason to implement the above. There's a reason I posted it as discussion, rather than feature request. – Ben Barden Nov 1 '13 at 17:17
  • The question is a feature request. You're proposing a potential feature. Mis-tagging it as something else doesn't change that. – Servy Nov 1 '13 at 17:19
  • Oh, and just for the record, virtually all deletions on this site are soft deletions, not hard deletions. "deleting" something is just hiding it from regular users and undoing all rep changes from votes on that question, so your proposal is to delete answers to closed questions, even though you didn't say that. – Servy Nov 1 '13 at 17:21
  • I may be misunderstanding the use of tags. I meant the tagging as a way of saying "I have thought of this as an interesting idea. I would like a discussion of it". If I had posted as feature request, I would have taken that to mean "We should totally do this thing." Am I wrong? Please enlighten me. – Ben Barden Nov 1 '13 at 17:21
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    A question tagged "feature request" is saying, "I have thought of this neat feature, we should discuss whether or not it should be implemented." It is starting a discussion about a possible feature, thus tagging it "discussion" isn't so much incorrect as it is redundant. – Servy Nov 1 '13 at 17:22
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    @Servy as part of it being a discussion, rather than a feature request, I included a "maybe this, maybe not". Likewise, I was intentionally nonspecific about which kinds of closings would call for this treatment. I figured that if it was a good idea, other people would have better ideas on specifics of implementation than I would. – Ben Barden Nov 1 '13 at 17:23
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    That is all appropriate for a feature request; a feature request need not have all of the exact implementation details exactly set in stone. A quality feature request also discusses both the advantages and disadvantages of the feature, as well as possible alternatives, but simply explains why the feature is worth implementing despite the disadvantages/alternatives. – Servy Nov 1 '13 at 17:24

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