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Since I've a database systems examination in less than 3 hours (from now), I have been browsing Stack Exchange network for questions with normalisation and related tags. Most of the questions are now closed as not constructive or others from the list.

Since, these questions are closed, no users are allowed to post answers to them (unless they are reopened). Why am I, then, allowed the option to protect such questions? Doesn't that beat the entire purpose behind "protecting" a question?

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    Well, I suppose it could be reasonable to protect a closed question that is about to be or expected to be reopened. The only problem is displaying the notice while it's actually closed. – animuson Feb 20 '14 at 5:58
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It is a bit of a quirk, but while the action is available to you, we don't expect that you'd use it unless you were doing so for a very specific purpose (such as noted in comments, a case where a spam magnet might be headed to reopening).

Some cars still come with the built-in cigarette lighter, and I believe they all have steering wheels. The manufacturer doesn't expect you to interact with the steering wheel using the cigarette lighter unless you have a very task-specific reason for doing so, such as setting the wheel on fire for dramatic effect.

While we should work out (again, noted in comments) the precedence of messages displayed, a matter of consensus, I don't see a reason to change this part of the behavior.

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    waits for the reports of Stack Exchange users setting their cars on fire to hit the major news outlets – animuson Feb 20 '14 at 6:14
  • It'll probably be one of the DBAs that tries it, because they're just crazy like that. – Tim Post Feb 20 '14 at 6:21
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    I always thought the cigarette lighter was there so we could plug various kitchen appliances into our cars – George Duckett Feb 20 '14 at 7:15
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    When car cigarette lighters were introduced 40 or more years ago the car manufacturers knew that we would need them for charging our iPads and Galaxy smartphones some time in the future. – slugster Feb 20 '14 at 7:57

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