4

The case in point is this edit.

Here, The edit was correctly rejected by one user and incorrectly approved by 3.

The underlying problem is that the three users (apparently) have little / no understanding of the language being used in the solution.

Editor 1: Approved
    Total Rep 3721
    Total Answers: 132
    Objective-C specific¹ answers: 2
    Objective-C specific score: 0 

Editor 2: Approved
    Total Rep 3134
    Total Answers: 28
    Objective-C specific answers: 0
    Objective-C specific score: 0 

Editor 3: Approved
    Total Rep 2721
    Total Answers: 151
    Objective-C specific questions: 7
    Objective-C specific answers: 1
    Objective-C specific score: 4 


Editor 4: Rejected
    Total Rep 10746
    Total Answers: 414
    Objective-C specific answers: about 20, some duplicates between tags.
    Objective-C specific score: >30, some duplicates between tags.

Here the pattern seems to be that those with low scores in the relevant tag, unsurprisingly, mistakenly approved an invalid flag.

Would a viable solution be to give higher weighting to those votes where the user voting has a given score in the answers tags?

¹ Those with tags I associate with Objective-C, , , etc. I may well have missed some.

  • 3
    This got nothing to do with flagging, suggested edit is just a suggested edit. No flags are involved in the process. – Shadow The Princess Wizard Feb 24 '14 at 9:11
  • This certainly seems reasonable idea, but one example is not a pattern. How many wrong decisions are made by users with experience in a tag, and would that result in more bad edits getting approved because the users review has a higher weight? – psubsee2003 Feb 24 '14 at 9:55
  • @ShadowWizard, Indeed, throughout, I probably meant "votes" – James Webster Feb 24 '14 at 10:11
  • @psubsee2003, that's a good point. My 1 example is hardly enough sample space. I can't think of an automated way to check using data.se to provide more examples, though the staff may be able to either back up or debunk the idea by working out if a significant number of edits have been approved, then rolled back. My only other alternative is the SE way: community. If enough people raise this concern, something is likely to be done. – James Webster Feb 24 '14 at 10:15