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I just came across this T-shirt that says "University of stackoverflow" and uses the site logo:

If not, then I'm essentially a tattle tale on the person who produced that T-shirt, because it uses artwork that I imagine is copyrighted. Sorry.

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    Arguably, the viral cc-by-sa license requires the rest of the stuff on the website to be under the same license, and the attribution is right there in the text on the shirt. – Wooble May 20 '14 at 14:51
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    IANAL, but I have carefully read the legal page and I can't find anything that explicitly forbids the use of the logos in this manner. That said, I feel sure that this violates the implicit "don't be a dick" that goes with every open source etc license - it may not be explicitly forbidden, but it certainly seems like bad form. – David X. Random May 20 '14 at 18:35
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    It's the first paragraph of the second section: "... All materials displayed or performed on the Network, including, but not limited to text, graphics, logos, tools, photographs, images, illustrations, software or source code, audio and video, and animations (collectively, “Content”) (other than Content posted by Subscriber (“Subscriber Content”)) are the property of Stack Exchange and/or third parties and are protected by United States and international copyright laws." Only user-generated content (Q's and A's) are covered by the CC license. @Wooble – jscs May 20 '14 at 18:47
  • @JoshCaswell: well, that's certainly what they claim is covered by the license. Copyleft purists may disagree on whether such a claim is legit. (disclaimer: I'm neither a lawyer nor a copyleft purist, but I am a devil's advocate) – Wooble May 20 '14 at 18:50
  • @Wooble: I see. The argument is that the appearance on the same web page of two sets of material automatically causes them to be available under the same terms? That's rather...bold. What's the "license" for my thesis when I include quotes that others hold the copyright for? – jscs May 20 '14 at 19:00
  • @JoshCaswell: presumably your use of quotes is under fair use and you're not building a collection of works that are all explicitly under a viral license. – Wooble May 20 '14 at 19:49
  • Let's just say for a second "it's illegal to put this tshirt for sale on, say, Zazzle". Let's say someone makes their own t-shirt and then goes around wearing it? Is that illegal? – James Jun 2 '14 at 9:40
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The design (which is quite good it has to be admitted) is not one I recognise - and I have a large number of T-Shirts :)

The Stack Exchange shop is currently closed and they are not selling merchandise at the moment.

T-shirts and other goodies are available but only as give-a-ways (events, competitions, rewards for top users etc.)

This shirt is not legitimate, but it's up to SE whether they take action or not.

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  • That is a pretty cool/quality design. Agreed all-around, otherwise, of course. – Andrew Barber May 20 '14 at 13:59
  • To be perfectly honest, I was really hoping that the answer to this would be "yes, it's legit" because I really want some official gear! Still, I suppose with the current arrangement it's more special if/when I do finally earn some. I'm going to hold off on the accept in case an SE employee wants to post an official stance on this, but thanks for confirming the situation nevertheless :-) – David X. Random May 20 '14 at 18:37
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    @DavidX.Random There's not much to add to what ChrisF already said. Unfortunately, this shirt isn't official in any way and, in fact, goes against our trademark guidance - Do not use the names or logos owned by Stack Exchange Inc. on any apparel or merchandise without our permission.. – Adam Lear May 20 '14 at 20:12
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    @AnnaLear Great, thanks for the input, nice to have an "official" comment :-) – David X. Random May 20 '14 at 23:44
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    @DavidXRandom Anytime. :) – Adam Lear May 20 '14 at 23:53

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