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I have only asked ONE question till now which is:

How to fire a trigger after the SPROC has completed execution?

It has received 3 up-votes so I think it wasn't a very low quality question. In comments/answers I wasn't even once told that the question was low-quality. Now when I go to ask another question I get the following message:

You have a history of asking low quality questions. Please put more thought, time, and effort into your questions. To help you do this, the number of questions you may ask per week is currently limited. For more information, visit the Help Center.

I don't even have a history, much less a "history of low-quality questions" and the one that I asked didn't even receive negative votes.

What is the reason I am being barred from asking questions?

marked as duplicate by 200_success, Robert Longson, rene support Dec 5 '18 at 19:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 3
    Are you 100% certain you never deleted a question before? It is only a warning, you are free to ignore it. – Martijn Pieters Jun 24 '14 at 15:18
  • @MartijnPieters - I don't remember deleting a post. All I did was a deleted an answer. And the reason to delete the answer was I received negative votes on that. And the reason that I received negative votes was because I had asked a question in the answer instead of adding a comment to a question. And the reason for that was I didn't had reputation points to add comment. And no one was answering the question as there are very few people that use that tech. (related to question) and I wanted to help the other guy. – Kunal B. Jun 24 '14 at 15:23
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    @MartijnPieters - It's not a warning. It blocks me add any questions. – Kunal B. Jun 24 '14 at 15:26
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    if you had a troublesome account deleted before, this is most likely recently introduced Anti-Recidivism System at work that deals "with users who request deletion in order to evade restrictions that are placed on their accounts at the time of deletion... If the user was blocked from posting questions at the time of deletion, then the recreated account will be restricted to posting only one question per week until the quality of their contributions is demonstrated..." – gnat Jun 24 '14 at 15:30
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    @KunalB.: as it turns out, you did delete something before. An account in negative standing. – Martijn Pieters Jun 24 '14 at 15:33
  • @KunalB.: and as the rate limit is a new one, I didn't realise you were blocked outright. – Martijn Pieters Jun 24 '14 at 15:34
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    @KunalB. You're not blocked from asking questions, you're simply rate limited. There's a big difference between not being able to ask questions at all, and having to wait some fraction of a week. – Servy Jun 24 '14 at 16:07
  • @Servy - For you it's a big difference. For me it's the same; I am barred for asking a question for rest of the week. So if my work depends on the answer to the question, I wait until my status is re-instated, which could be weeks. And I would only know about it as the time passes. – Kunal B. Jun 24 '14 at 16:20
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    @KunalB. So for you whether or not you can ever ask questions again after the end of the week is irrelevant? You'll never ask a question again after the end of this week? For someone who claims to be incapable of performing his work without asking other people to do it for him, that seems rather surprising – Servy Jun 24 '14 at 16:22
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    If you require free support in order to do your job, I think this rate limit is a good thing. It will give you the skills to be able to solve your own problems, which is something every single programmer needs. Or it'll just prevent you from asking. In either case, the experts are happy. – fbueckert Jun 24 '14 at 16:35
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    Let's see: Your previous questions were of such bad quality that you couldn't ask any more questions and you deleted your previous account. Now you're back, and you are allowed to ask questions again, but much more slowly. Why are you complaining? Isn't this an improvement over the previous situation where you could no longer ask any questions at all? If this is a major hardship, and you cannot work anymore, then spend your idle time answering other questions. If your answers are good, you will be able to ask more questions very soon. You have a way out - will you take it? – Adam Davis Jun 24 '14 at 18:11
  • link This what wanted to say. – Kunal B. Jun 25 '14 at 3:25
45

This happened because you had an account that was blocked from asking questions, and returned after requesting deletion of your account, which we obliged.

We're happy to give you an almost clean slate, but we must also protect the quality of the resource that we're building. To this, we just ask that as you start off again, you treat questions as a consumable resource that can in fact be depleted. Doing this might have saved you from the automatic block that you encountered previously.

The good news is, it only takes a few good questions and answers to have this restriction lifted. Ask questions only when you really need to, and make them count when you do. This restriction is not nearly as difficult to work out of as the previous one that you encountered, it's there just to slow you down so you really put some effort into your posts. There's also no mechanism to lift it, other than establishing yourself as a user. Even a developer can't lift this, it's hard-coded.

This went out in a recent change that aimed to prevent users from circumventing system restrictions (automated blocks, moderator issued suspensions, etc) by simply requesting deletion and then returning. We had to do something about that as part of our work to make sure the perceived quality of the site remains high.

This change is active on all sites where automated post blocks are enabled.

Worth noting

This does not affect your ability to answer questions, and you could conceivably lift this restriction in a matter of days if you so choose.

  • You may not realize, but doing this has put too many restriction. I have been using SO for years not as a contributor, but as a consumer. And then I realized that I should also contribute to the community so I registered with SO and started contributing to the forum. But after having these setbacks SO has developed a NEGATIVE reputation in my mind. There are few too many restrictions and policies that PROHIBIT newbies to get PRIVILEGES. A newbie cannot add comments to a new question, if one needs clarification [SHORTCOMING]. – Kunal B. Jun 24 '14 at 15:40
  • ...continued If he tries to circumvent that he is penalized for doing that. I know I would be BLOCKED AGAIN by raising voice, and I don't care for that. And on issue of LOW-QUALITY questions, I would say THERE ARE NO BAD QUESTIONS. – Kunal B. Jun 24 '14 at 15:43
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    @KunalB. If you ask the other hundreds of thousands of people that put a lot of work into this site, they would very likely disagree and tell you that there are plenty of bad questions that makes them want to stop participating. It's them, the overwhelming majority that our efforts must serve. We can not allow our quality to plummet because that's what made us the success that we are. Scream at me all you like, I encourage it, because every iteration that you articulate gets better, and that's all I want for you and everyone else that learns how to effectively communicate using SO. – Tim Post Jun 24 '14 at 15:47
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    @KunalB. I am one of those that would disagree with you. There are plenty of bad questions. The whole point of the SE network is for quality contributions. Questions that display zero effort, thought, or complexity are bad questions. We're not here to hold your hand through your problems. We're here because it's a place where quality is first and foremost the focus. No quality = no help. – fbueckert Jun 24 '14 at 16:31
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    @KunalB. - I also highly recommend reading "Optimizing For Pearls, Not Sand". – Brad Larson Jun 24 '14 at 16:49
  • 1
    @TimPost while we're at it, do you by chance know if anti-recidivism system is protected from tricks with migrations similar to ones used in the past to hack around question ban? – gnat Jun 24 '14 at 18:12
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    @gnat It's a work-in-progress. We're going to be modifying the question block system a bit to introduce 'rolling' rate limits that ease as you improve, but become more strict if you don't, ultimately leading to an all out block. Q-blocks worked fine at the scale that they were introduced but with voting being so much heavier these days, folks often can't get out of them, so we're accounting for that. Once all that gets in place I believe we will be calculating if the user is at their 'quota' during migration, but we have a bit more to build first. – Tim Post Jun 25 '14 at 5:42
  • understood, thanks! great to know that team is aware of this and taking care of it – gnat Jun 25 '14 at 8:15
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    Follow-up, yes - migrations are now rejected if they'd put you over your quota on the target site. – Tim Post Jun 26 '14 at 13:46
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    @TimPost so, if I'm understanding you correctly, the system will ultimately be implemented so that you can still be totally blocked from asking questions, but there will be a throttling system put in place before you get there, is that correct? Does that mean that, for some users, they will never get out of a question ban, even with new accounts? – user163250 Jun 27 '14 at 17:54
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    @Cupcake Yes, barring a Herculean effort. Once implemented, if you face the 'Sorry, we're not accepting questions' thing, then you just need to go somewhere else, or learn how to program before getting a job where you do programming. Some get off on the wrong foot, so we need to optimize for them better. The real vamps, well, just keep vamping, and they're not a problem we're interested in solving. – Tim Post Jul 1 '14 at 19:21

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