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I just came across this suggested edit on Board & Card Games:

an answer getting entirely defaced and replaced with spammy links

I've seen spammy edits like this on multiple Stack Exchange sites. They always follow the same pattern: the comment is an email address, they're from an anonymous user, and the edit consists of wiping the contents of the answer in question and replacing it with a ton of anchor tag links to all kinds of crap.

I assume this is already understood as a problem. (If not: hey SE employees, there's a particular kind of spam attack that keeps hitting the suggested edit queue.) I reject the edit as vandalism whenever I see them.

However, in the name of stopping spammers: is there more I can do, or should I reject it as vandalism, do nothing else and move on?

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    There's something related here about the e-mail address in edit summaries: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/207837/… – PeterJ Jul 2 '14 at 6:37
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    I'm curious too. Does marking an edit as vandalism confer any penalty to the user like a spam flag would? (Or is that impossible because the user is anonymous?) I see Tim Post's answer pointing in that direction, but it would be reassuring to know. – Nick Stauner Jul 2 '14 at 6:41
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    @NickStauner no penalty and those are usually submitted by anonymous visitors without any account. What it does is improving the auto block system though. – ShaWiz Jul 2 '14 at 7:03
  • I've brought it up to @GraceNote before. I believe the response is the spam flags tighten up the restrictions from that IP. – fbueckert Jul 2 '14 at 14:01
  • By spam flags do you mean spam/vandalism rejections? – doppelgreener Jul 2 '14 at 14:06
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The best thing you should do when reviewing these is to mark them as rejected with the "This edit introduces spam, defaces the post in some way, or is otherwise inappropriate." reason, as you did. We track data on edits rejected with that reason in the same way we monitor for posts that are deleted via spam flags, which is used to help protect against future spam. You don't need to do more than that, setting that rejection reason is your task and we'll be handling the rest from there. ♪

That said if you do identify particular strings of a specific sort of spam, raising a meta as you are now or reporting via the Contact Us form so that we may consider additional measures, that never hurts to do as well. But for general spam handling, just using the right rejection reason will be fine.

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