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I am the creator of StackStalker, a Chrome extension created to simply monitor questions a user chooses and be notified when they've been updated. I've been working on updating it to use the new API 2.2. In order to cut down my test loop during development, I've shortened my polling time. Unfortunately, while testing, I made too many calls and have been "throttled" for what seems like a full day (~65k seconds).

After some research I discovered that you can authenticate your app to increase your quota, but was saddened when I read that it required the user to log in. I would prefer not to force my users to log in if they don't want to, as you shouldn't have to be a Stack Exchange user to benefit from the site.

Is there a way to authenticate my app without necessarily authenticating my user? I'm definitely registered at StackApps and have been for quite some time.

EDIT - Note, I didn't make that many calls, either, but there was one instance where an errant function probably made more than 30 calls a second for a few seconds. My daily API call quota looks to be in the 900s still.

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Logging in is not required to get a higher quota, just providing the application key is enough. The current version of the documentation says:

After that, applications are sorted into two distinct throttles. Those with, and those without, valid access_tokens (obtained via authenticating a user).

If an application does not have an access_token, then the application shares an IP based quota with all other applications on that IP. This quota is based on the key being passed by the applications; it is the max of the daily request limit for the applications involved, which by default is 10,000. This quota scheme is essentially unchanged from earlier versions of the API.


but there was one instance where an errant function probably made more than 30 calls a second for a few seconds.

That's likely to impose additional restraints on the access, but fortunately it can be solved by fixing the bug in your extension.

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