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Are there any official guidelines or rules for editing (others') questions?

and/or

What is your opinion on what is reasonable?

If someone seriously changes my question in a way I don't like, (when) is it appropriate to "roll back" these changes? And is there a simple way to do it?

2
  • the rollback is simple; there is a button for it. Apr 17, 2015 at 21:43
  • 1
    Reasonable is as much as the question needs. This question feels like you have a specific edit that you didn't like, so if you want to link to it, I'm sure people would be happy to explain what was right or wrong about that edit. Apr 17, 2015 at 22:09

1 Answer 1

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Are there any official guidelines or rules for editing (others') questions?

There's the Help Center, which is searchable, but specifically:

When should I edit posts?

Any time you feel you can make the post better, and are inclined to do so. Editing is encouraged!

Some common reasons to edit are:

to fix grammatical or spelling mistakes
to clarify the meaning of a post without changing it
to correct minor mistakes or add addendums / updates as the post ages
to add related resources or hyperlinks

Try to make the post substantively better when you edit, not just change a single character. Tiny, trivial edits are discouraged.

Though you should check the specific sites, there may be differences.
e.g. Stack Overflow Edit page

General:

How does editing work?

What is a 'rollback'?

Site Search

If you search the site you'll find all sorts of related discussions.

On topic:
How to handle large suggested edit from possible collaborator?

Approving overly substantial edits to answers

As you've not been terribly specific:

Should users edit other users' posts to correct grammar and spelling problems?

What should I do when a user repeatedly rejects or roll-backs valid edits to his/her post(s)?

Was it correct to roll this edit back?

Other possibly related:

What should I do when a user repeatedly rejects or roll-backs valid edits to his/her post(s)?

Is it OK to edit a correct answer for fullness instead of answering?

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