2

Problem

The Stack Exchange search engine allows some parameters with boundaries, like

votes..0
votes:0..3
votes3..

There's a problem with the boundary from X to infinity:

https://meta.stackexchange.com/search?q=votes%3A0..

When used in a question, answer, or a comment the trailing dots are not parsed as a link (also check with the comment behind this post):

https://meta.stackexchange.com/search?q=votes%3A0..

Proposed solution

Search page URL should have a trailing + symbol, which becomes a space in the search string. The search query should stay the same, and the URL be like

https://meta.stackexchange.com/search?q=votes%3A0..+

https://meta.stackexchange.com/search?q=votes%3A0..+

Such link should open like this (no change from current behaviour):

Enter image description here

I'm aware of the + symbol and can add it manually. But it would be great if the URL automatically contained it, so anybody who copy-pastes the URL string would have a valid URL.

3

Just add a + to the end of the URL:

Alternatively, you can forcibly treat the entire string as a link, using standard Markdown:

  • Thanks, it solves half the issue. Indeed, I'd like this to be added to URL by the engine, so that everybody gets a valid URL by copying it from a browser tab. – Nick Volynkin Jul 19 '15 at 13:13
  • @Nick This is more of a problem with the Markdown parsing process. Both URLs, with and without +, are valid and work correctly. It's just that the auto-linking on plain links doesn't hyperlink the entire link. You can force this in numerous ways with Markdown, but the original link is a valid URL. – grg Jul 19 '15 at 13:17
  • I agree that it is valid. But since there's seems to be no way to fix it directly in Markdown (what if I just put a dot after my link?), I'd like to have this crutch. So it's a crutch-request, heh ) – Nick Volynkin Jul 19 '15 at 13:26
  • @Nick You can fix it with Markdown in numerous ways. There's one shown in my answer, but any inline link syntax works fine. – grg Jul 19 '15 at 13:27

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