4

When I enter in https://stackoverflow.com/reputation I get:

total votes: 13612
../..
** total rep 77748 :)

When I do the same in https://askubuntu.com/reputation I get:

total votes: 146
../..
** total rep 715 :)

A reputation of 77K comes from 7.8K votes, the most (because reputation comes quite often from accepted answers). Similarly, 715 rep is around 70 votes.

So I wonder: what does this "total votes" refer to? Adding the votes that I casted to the sum does not become this number, neither.

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According to the FAQ describing how to audit your reputation, there are 8 different 'votes' counted in the list:

  • accepted answer (to or from you)
  • upvote (to you)
  • downvote (to or from you)
  • penalty for post flagged as offensive
  • bounty grant (from you)
  • bounty award (to you)
  • penalty for post flagged as spam
  • edit suggestion approved

So in fact it aren't just votes, it is anything that influences your reputation.

  • 1
    Mmm I still miss numbers. I counted the lines of /reputation in Stack Overflow that do not start with "--" (dates) and I see 8416. If I add my almost 6000 votes cast, the number looks quite similar to the "total votes". So maybe it is this: upvotes, downvotes, accepts received + votes cast. Edit: but no, in Ask Ubuntu this rule doesn't match. – fedorqui says Reinstate Monica Sep 3 '15 at 10:04
  • Maybe it includes your downvotes too since they influence your score too. – Patrick Hofman Sep 3 '15 at 10:07
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    Looks like own upvotes also counted, even though they do not affect reputation. – Shadow The Princess Wizard Sep 3 '15 at 14:24
  • 1
    Thanks for the update. However, it still doesn't explain all the total votes. If you download your /reputation in a file, say rep and run this little script: awk 'NR==1; $1 == 1 || $1 == 2 || $1 == 3 || $1 == 4 || $1 == 8 || $1 == 9 || $1 == 12 || $1 == 16 {s++} END {print "counted votes:", s}' rep you are likely to get different values. To me, total votes: 13628 whereas the sum is 7544. – fedorqui says Reinstate Monica Sep 4 '15 at 9:19

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