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1. Example

user @bytebuster Stack Exchange profile (archive copy):

Since February 2014, Ukraine is suffering from Russia's armed invasion. If we fail to stop the Russian tanks in Ukraine, we would have to stop them in Poland, Baltic states, and finally, in your backyard. Don't wait till the last moment. The world has to stay together to stop Russian invasion in Europe as well as the Russian-equipped, Russian-trained, Russian-financed, and Russian-inspired terrorism all over the world.

Part of his answer in Travel Stack Exchange (archive copy):

At the moment, Russian language is associated with Russian invasion even though a lot of people still speak Russian. For me speaking Russian in Ukraine is like going to WWII occupied France(1) and trying to speak German with French people.

I think, that it contains non-neutral political phrases and terms.


2. Questions

    1. Is this @bytebuster content allowable for Stack Exchange sites?
      • 1.1. If no, what is best for users to do, who saw this content? Flag to moderators or is it better to do something different?

3. My opinion

See @FactorMystic message:

I am completely uninterested in being badgered about social causes when I visit a site for expertise. I literally do not care what the cause is. I don't care which political groups support it even if those are the same as political groups I personally agree with, and I am disinclined to spend time here if on every page I have to scroll past some kind of social/political guilt trip.


4. See also

  • 9
    There's nobody telling you that you need to view everyone's profile. If you're worried you might see something you won't want to see, just don't do it. People say whatever they want; as far as I know, there is no moderation on that. As for the answer, ... no comment. – zondo Apr 7 '17 at 14:28
  • You are correct. It contains non neutral political terms. But your premise that people must be neutral is weird and incorrect. It's their profile. It's a free form text field. Non neutrality is neither a violation of law nor etiquette. Oh well, you disagree. It doesn't get to be censored just because you disagree. You must respect those who disagree, and censorship is just your promotion of social causes in disguise. – Jason C Apr 7 '17 at 15:59
  • 4
    Btw, you profile is in Russian. I can't read it without a translator. Please change it. Also asking people to explain downvotes is frowned upon by me. It is also the cause of many heated meta discussions, and is controversial. Please remove the last paragraph of your profile. – Jason C Apr 7 '17 at 16:11
  • 1
    @JasonC Why shouldn't his profile be in Russian? His main site is the Russian SO. – DavidPostill Apr 7 '17 at 19:56
  • 11
    @DavidPostill - I think Jason was being sarcastic, the author is asking for another user's profile content to be changed (i guess thats the point of this question) and Jason is being sarcastic in saying "well I can't read yours and I also dislike you asking people to explain downvotes" but I don't speak for Jason. – Ramhound Apr 7 '17 at 20:22
15

What users put in their user profile is up to them, as long as it is not illegal (within (international) law, accepted norms and customs, common sense) and still fits the be nice policy.
Something that makes you or anyone else uncomfortable should not be forbidden, a priori.

As for the answer:
To me it reads as an precaution to travelers using the Russian language and why it is so delicate, which is on topic on a travel site; it is what the question asks for and therefore is an answer and relevant.

Do note that the text is not from @bytebuster but from another answer, they are just paraphrasing.

To answer your questions:

Is this @bytebuster content allowable for Stack Exchange sites?

Yes, it is. And if it isn't remove the original as well.

If no, what is best for users to do, who saw this content? Flag to moderators or is it better to do something different?

I already said yes, but you could politely point out in a comment why the wording is causing friction. Maybe both the OP and the commenter can work out a different wording that still covers the intent.

It is unavoidable that on a travel site you sometimes have to address the political situation in a country to make sure travelers will be safe. If that can be done free from any opinion that is preferred. But it sometimes is necessary to address deeper emotions in an attempt to prevent escalation when on the ground.

0

ByteBuster did not say "At the moment ...". He quoted someone else who did so. Part of his answer was

"As a foreigner, what language should I choose to speak in Kyiv?" — since this is Travel.SE, the OP may be also interested how to choose the language to use in Ukraine. I would recommend to read Which languages to brush up on for Ukraine trip? question and its answers. This answer summarizes it very well:

If your goal is to make an impression on locals I would definitely go with Ukrainian. At the moment, Russian language is associated with Russian invasion even though a lot of people still speak Russian.

For me speaking Russian in Ukraine is like going to WWII occupied France(1) and trying to speak German with French people. I am not telling that you will get in trouble with Russian, but you could be more considerate to the local population.

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