0
votes

This post exists purely to house answers formerly attached to the formatting sandbox. You can safely ignore it.

locked by Shog9 May 16 '17 at 19:56

This question exists because it has historical significance, but it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site so please do not use it as evidence that you can ask similar questions here. This question and its answers are frozen and cannot be changed. See the help center for guidance on writing a good question.

Read more about locked posts here.

625 Answers 625

0
votes
if (isset($item['load_functions'][1]) && !empty($item['map'][2]) && $item['load_functions'][3] == 'node_load') {
  $node = $router_item['map'][4];
}
else {
  // The menu item is not for a node.
}

menu_get_object()

menu_get_item()

0
votes

test. to see, if the spaces: removed! are? visible/ without the' show mark- down differences'

2nd test to see if I can edit a deleted ans

0
votes

uhm..why _italic_does_not_work_when_I_use_the_underscore_ ?

How about

  1. foo[bar + 1]
  2. foo[bar + 1]
  3. *foo[bar + 1]
0
votes

  • This is a test of an empty answer... – Richard J. Ross III Nov 26 '12 at 16:16
  • ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ – hims056 Aug 9 '13 at 9:55
  • This is a test of an empty comment! – hims056 Aug 9 '13 at 9:55
0
votes

Testing the tag feature... I don't think I have it right...

Sweet, that was too simple ... (

spoiler text in a blockquote?

0
votes

Partially bold **Part**<!-- fix -->ially bold

partially italic *part*<!-- fix -->ially italic

Partially bold/italic ***Part***<!-- fix -->ially bold/italic

OLD:

Partially bold

partially italic

****Part****ially bold/italic

**Part**ially bold

*part*ially italic

****Part****ially bold/italic
0
votes

XSS

0
votes

Test test test test

More test

foo test

b ar f efe fe ge ge g

ge

akeoka feafkae kfoa ejfoeaj

0
votes

Is <something> no in longer hidden (where something is not an allowed HTML tag)?

Conclusion: there is no change, but <> seems to be a special case. Encoding < as &lt; is still required (if not formatted as by code).

0
votes

Testing image upload from clipboard

enter image description here

  • How is testing a misspelled word? – Cole Johnson Jul 26 '13 at 4:24
0
votes

blah blah blah blah howdy doodie doo

  • Helloo <!--1234567890--> – American Luke Jul 4 '13 at 0:17
  • Hello &#32;&#32;&#32;&#32;&#32;&#32;&#32;&#32;&#32;&#32; – American Luke Jul 4 '13 at 0:17
  • Hello &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; – American Luke Jul 4 '13 at 0:19
  • Hello * * * * * * * * – American Luke Jul 4 '13 at 0:21
  • Hello &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; – American Luke Jul 4 '13 at 0:22
  • Hello &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; . – American Luke Jul 4 '13 at 0:23
0
votes
if (isset($item['load_functions'][1]) && !empty($item['map'][2]) && $item['load_functions'][3] == 'node_load') {
  $node = $router_item['map'][4];
}
else {
  // The menu item is not for a node.
}

menu_get_object()

menu_get_item()

0
votes

Testing 2.2 - o83fpubgs487gs4e8o7ghs4o78gfbysf76esfb9of3si76ffs39hgs4678gf3s9h3s8gof3.

0
votes

Wheeeeeeeeeee!

  1. This is number one
     2. This is a sub ordered list
     3. You can hack code together here, too
      4. Blah blah blah
      5. Blah blah, blah blah blah.

I'm amazed if the quality checker lets this go through.

0
votes

Please see the changelog - this is to demonstrate an issue with the toolbar buttons and existing square brackets.

Testing arrays in arrays:

b[0][1] b[1][2] b[1][3] b[0][4]

(b[0][5] b[1][6]) (b[0][7] b[0][8])

enter image description here

a_b_c

a__b__c

a___b___c

a____b____c

  • Testing `backtick escapes` still code? – Hannele Jul 25 '13 at 15:24
  • Testing `\` still code? – Hannele Jul 25 '13 at 15:24
  • \\` still code ? – Hannele Jul 25 '13 at 15:25
  • \\ still code ?` – Hannele Jul 25 '13 at 15:25
0
votes

Testing a possible edit bug.

Here is some more text. Made an edit.

0
votes

Code formatting:

some kind of shell commandwith a `sub-shell command` | blah blah

0
votes

Testing the syntax highlighter

So {this:is css; /*comment*/}

Testing the syntax highlighter

So {this:is none; /*comment*/}

Testing the syntax highlighter

So {this:is none; /*comment*/}

Testing the syntax highlighter

So {this:is text; /*comment*/}

Testing the syntax highlighter

So {this:is c; /*comment*/}

Testing the syntax highlighter

So {this:is html; /*comment*/}
0
votes

attempting to fail quality filter on the formatting sandbox. http://goo.gl/82FLe

enter link description here

0
votes

. .

  • minimum 30 characters limits can be ignored by spaces... – Zaheer Ahmed Sep 13 '13 at 13:26
0
votes

Testing nested quote levels and blank space:

The grey box of epicness!

Does it work with <pre>'s?

Apparently so!

Yay crappy formatting.

0
votes

answer go wrong way!

0
votes

beep beep i'm a jeep

beep beep i'm a jeep

beep beep i'm a jeep beep beep i'm a jeep beep beep i'm a jeep beep beep i'm a jeep beep beep i'm a jeep
  • 1
    You just had to test the HTML didn't you? :P – Madara Uchiha Sep 27 '13 at 13:01
  • Guilty as charged :) – Stijn Sep 27 '13 at 13:01
  • beep beep you're a jeep – dorukayhan Nov 10 '16 at 23:47
0
votes
  • Test [su]

Lorem ipsum blah blah blah

0
votes

alert(42);zzz

0
votes

SOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSOSO

  • 3
    And an excessively long flag. ;P – animuson Aug 22 '13 at 4:24
0
votes

I'm using jQuery with the cookies library that automatically JSON-stringifies structures when setting cookies and rebuilds them again when getting the cookie.

I'm using cookies to provide an undo-redo functionality for a web form that can include a lot of text, so every time an input element changes I collect all the data in the form and put it all in a cookie called newsletterDoX (where X is an integer) and I also set another cookie to store the current integer and another to store how many redos are available. Cookies are set to expire after one day.

The functionality is working, but when there is more than 4 newsletterDo cookies then a page refresh will give me a 400 error. In Chome it says

Bad Request

Your browser sent a request that this server could not understand. Size of a request header field exceeds server limit.

Cookie

/n

When I delete the cookies back down to 4 or less then the error goes away. I think I got to 5 or 6 without the error with Firefox.

What's going on? I don't think it's the size of the cookies, or the content. The cookies beyond 4 can have the same size and content as those below 4 and it still gives the error.

The total number of cookies in the domain is as low as 12 when the error occurs, and deleting some other cookies rather than the newsletterDo cookies doesn't seem to change things, so the number of cookies probably isn't a problem either.

What could it be? I'm stumped!

here's the code that sets the cookies:

// cookies expire 1 day from now.
// I'm sure there's a more succinct way to set the expiry date,
// but this is working for me
var oneDay = new Date();
oneDay.setDate(oneDay.getDate() + 1);
jQuery.cookies.setOptions({expiresAt: oneDay});

// this function saves the form data so the user can come back to it
var setNewsletterCookie = function() {
    var saveData = collectNewsletterData();
    // save it in the database using the php code that acts as a db interface
    jQuery.post('db_interface_newsletters.php', {
        task: "save",
        title: $('#newsletterTitle').val(),
        issue: $('#issuenum').val(),
        content: saveData},
        function(data) {
            if (data.indexOf('Fail') >= 0) {alert (data);}
            else {
                // data should be a date string in UTC
                // convert it to local time and display
                var lastSaveDate = new Date(data);
                $('.last_save_date').text(lastSaveDate.toLocaleString());
            }
        }
    );
    // save it also in a cookie for use of undo and redo
    try {
        var currentNewsletterDo = parseInt(jQuery.cookies.get('current_newsletter_do'), 10);
        if (isNaN(currentNewsletterDo)) currentNewsletterDo = 0;
    } catch(e) {
        var currentNewsletterDo = 0;
    }
    ++currentNewsletterDo;
    jQuery.cookies.set('newsletterDo' + currentNewsletterDo, saveData);
    jQuery.cookies.set('current_newsletter_do', currentNewsletterDo);
    jQuery.cookies.set('newsletter_available_redo', 0);
    $('.newsletter_redo').button('disable');
    $('.newsletter_undo').button('enable');
};
0
votes

Code formatting

Block code

Somewhat code

  • 1
    This is a comment‮dilav sa deggalf neeb sah tnemmoc sihT ‭ – Ry- Oct 17 '13 at 16:57
  • 3
    This is another comment‮emoswa sa deggalf neeb sah tnemmoc sihT ‭ – Andrew Barber Oct 17 '13 at 17:27
0
votes

I am asking how to use jQuery to add numbers i tried $("2+2") but it didnt work

how to do in jquery

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .