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I have a habit that whenever I see a bad answer, I flag as NAA or VLQ and leave a (auto) comment to point out the reason for my flag. Sometimes after six to eight weeks a few hours the author sees my comment and improves the answer, which makes some answers, especially previously link-only, into a decent or a fair one. When I see the improvement and determines that it looks good, I always retract my NAA or VLQ flag.

Question is: Is it fine to have a number of retracted flags in my flag history? Is my behavior correct? I know it's bad to have declined flags, but not disputed.

  • What does NAA mean? – QuIcKmAtHs Jan 9 '18 at 21:55
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    Not An Answer. – Nij Jan 9 '18 at 22:04
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Retracted flags do not count towards your declined/helpful ratio, which is the only thing that really matters (>25% with 10 or more flags results in a 7 day flag ban). Disputed flags don't count either.

leave a (auto) comment to point out the reason for my flag.

Great, not everybody does this (I forget it sometimes as well), but as the author doesn't see that their post is flagged, the comment is the only indicator to improve their post.

When I see the improvement and determines that it looks good, I always retract my NAA or VLQ flag.

Absolutely, you risk a declined flag if you don't. Retracting a flag will not remove the post from the Low Quality Posts review queue, but it never hurts to have another pair of eyes looking at it.

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    Are you sure about retracted flags not removing posts from the queue? – Nathan Tuggy Jan 10 '18 at 2:14
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    @NathanTuggy yes, but it took a while to find the reference. See What happens to a flagged post in review if the flag is self-removed?. Obviously, a custom moderator flag does get removed from the queue, but this was about NAA/VLQ ones. – Glorfindel Jan 10 '18 at 7:25
  • I'm not at all convinced that Shog meant "retracted flags never stop having an effect", when it is far more likely that he simply meant "creating a review task and then invalidating it a minimum of 15 minutes later, or worst-case just before it's finished, can disrupt reviewers while they're working on it, even though the retraction will invalidate the review task at the next run". After all, animuson explicitly says on the same question you linked to that retractions do invalidate tasks eventually. – Nathan Tuggy Jan 10 '18 at 17:31

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