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I am a relative newbie on Stack Exchange, and use the same single-sign-on account to log in to all of the Stack Exchange websites. I understand that reputation and badges are counted separately for each site, and that there is an association bonus of 100 points awarded to all sites upon reaching 200 reputation on any site. I am trying to earn this reputation bonus so I can get past new user restrictions no matter what site I am on.

However, I find it difficult and time-consuming to reach this stage based on my current activity on the network, and it is especially tiring when I keep on joining new sites only to have to start from scratch as if I was a new user on any of the network sites.

How do I, if possible, have my new user restrictions on Meta lifted manually (without the need to earn reputation)?

For example, would it be possible a moderator or someone with sufficient privileges to evaluate my recent activity on the sites in which I am active on and say, allow me to comment, flag posts, and so on, on new sites in which I register, based on how well I do so on existing sites?

This would not only help me save time, but also allow me to concentrate and put my effort into asking and answering questions, all without having to go through the same process over and over again.

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    Possible duplicate of Why are reputation points the basis for obtaining privileges – gnat Jan 30 '18 at 20:25
  • Given my rather...uncanny knowledge of the SE network, I would argue that this request should be implemented for me on Meta. But that same knowledge tells me that it's a bad idea in nature. – Sonic the Reinstate Monica-hog Jan 30 '18 at 20:43
  • 200 reputation is a single answer that's been upvoted 10 times. Even less if you answer multiple questions, or ask your own questions in the process. You are basically talking about 10 votes, indicating your contribution to the community, was helpful – Ramhound Jan 30 '18 at 20:48
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    @Ramhound: I think you mean 20 votes, not 10. Getting from 100 to 200 requires 10 votes, but the user does not have that 100 yet. – Nathan Tuggy Jan 30 '18 at 20:59
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    I failed at math stop mocking me, ;-). Yes, 20. – Ramhound Jan 30 '18 at 21:03
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    @Ramhound ...this, or 100 accepted edit suggestions. At a site like Stack Overflow getting this done could be a matter of just 3-5 days – gnat Jan 30 '18 at 21:15
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    Don't you feel it is unfair to other users if the restrictions are removed just for you? Your most compelling reason seem to be saves me time which is probably true but thinking that your time is more precious than that of all others is a rather self-centered view of reality. – rene Jan 30 '18 at 21:56
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Moderators don't have the ability to do that.

Some of the staff do, but the only way they would do that is if they make you a moderator on a site - which won't happen if you don't have any site experience.

So, in effect, no. There's no way to get past the reputation requirements other than getting to 200 reputation on one site.

I think it's important to look at it from a learning perspective. Yes, we're preventing you from using certain features... but we're also saving you from your lack of experience at the same time.

Let's look at your question here. You have 1 reputation and you can't go below that. If you'd asked this question after having the association bonus, you'd have dropped from 101 reputation to 91 reputation (as of writing) due to down votes. With sufficient additional down votes you could lose the privileges you gained due to the association bonus, including the ability to comment everywhere and upvote anything.

Making you wait a bit and put in some work gives you more time to fail more without it negatively affecting your reputation. So, keep joining new sites, find one that you love, earn that first 200 reputation, and then join the ranks of users having to worry that their first post on a new site will cause them to take some major damage from down votes.

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Yes, there is in fact a way to get privileges without earning the required amount of reputation. You have to be a moderator. To have that access on all sites would require being an employee of SE (some of whom are given moderator privileges on all sites, if their role requires such access).

Whether that's more or less work than earning 200 reputation on any site is up to you to figure out.

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