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Sometimes questions are deleted, like this. When someone like me invests some work to answer such a question, it is not nice that the answer isn't readable in my personal activity. Are my now-deleted answers accessible somewhere else?

I've done a little research about this topic and I found an answer here and a more clear one here. I'm on a beta site and am not a moderator.

On these sites, a situation sometimes occurs when a user joins the site for one question, sees what happens and deletes the account after some time. This will probably delete the question and the answer(s).

Is there a way to lower the barriers to read the deleted answers by me?

I don't want to recreate the question, if the answer is readable it is enough for me.

  • For context, what happened here is that the user answered a downvoted question, and a few seconds after they posted their answer the author deleted their account, causing the question to be automatically deleted. – Sonic the Masked Werehog Sep 29 '18 at 8:26
  • I don't know if the question was downvoted. It was definitly not off-topic. @robert-longsom Is there a how-to for this process? I did not fully understand your hint. – giftnuss Sep 29 '18 at 8:28
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As the author of an answer to a deleted question, you can see the deleted question and your answer if you have the direct link to it.

For 60 days after your answer was deleted, you can get a link to your deleted answer by going to the "answers" tab of your profile and clicking on "recently deleted answers".

If, as you assert, the question is indeed on-topic, and since the author deleted their account (and their post) just seconds after you posted your answer, I'd file a request on the per-site meta to have the question undeleted. If your answer had had enough time to be upvoted, it would have prevented the question from being deleted, as downvoted questions with upvoted answers aren't deleted upon user deletion (and the author would have been prevented from deleting it manually).

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