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I'm sure it's happened to you: you're browsing Stack Overflow, when you see that amazingly tempting HNQ in the corner. You click on it, and have an immediate urge to comment/upvote. You click the little button...and see the "Join this Community to post" popup.

Of course, you can just join that community, but you'll eventually end up with tons of Stack Exchange accounts with no questions, answers, or reputation above 101. It would be great if you could just click the dang upvote button! Of course, as a user without the starting bonus of 100, this shouldn't apply (Except maybe for comments).

At first, this sounds kind of dumb. But when you see a good question, or a great answer, or have a sudden urge to comment, you should really be able to!

Edit: This post has been marked a duplicate of this question. It is clearly not, because my question is from a completely different viewpoint. They are anti-duplicates.

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No. One of the major problems with Hot Network Questions is drive-by voting and commenting; the interests of the community might be contrary to what the general Stack Exchange population thinks. Implementing this feature request would make this even worse.

I think most sites would be happier if somebody would not only have to actively choose to sign up/join, but also read the Tour and visit the site for "6-8 weeks" before actually being able to upvote/comment (thanks to the association bonus).

but you'll eventually end up with tons of Stack Exchange accounts with no questions, answers, or reputation above 101.

There's absolutely nothing wrong with that, but if you want to, you can hide them. Or get some reputation anyway.

  • "visit the site for 6-8 weeks" is a bit too much to ask before posting a comment! Visiting the site for a week would be helpful to new users before posting their first question or an answer but fat chance of that ever happening. – Mari-Lou A Nov 4 '18 at 8:22
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    That was meant figuratively, on Meta it's being used to indicate all kinds of periods which take longer if you need to wait for them. I've added a link in case users are not familiar with the meme, thanks for the notification. – Glorfindel Nov 4 '18 at 8:32
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    You should use scare quotes "blah, blah" to show irony. I almost downvoted b/c I thought it was a ridiculous piece of advice. And I think the "6-8 weeks" meme refers to bug fixes and FR...so not exactly the same scenario here. But if that's how you folks roll here, who am I to suggest otherwise? – Mari-Lou A Nov 4 '18 at 8:34
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    @Mari-LouA Historically speaking, 6-8 weeks is not too far fetched. One of the Netiquette guidelines for online one-to-many communication used to be "Read both mailing lists and newsgroups for one to two months before you post anything. This helps you to get an understanding of the culture of the group." This might be a bit much nowadays, but in general I wish users would lurk more before interacting with a site. – Modus Tollens Nov 4 '18 at 9:18
  • @ModusTollens wait between six to eight weeks before upvoting or posting a comment on Stack Exchange (when you have the association bonus)? The site would close down within months. People do not even have to register in order to post a question, the whole culture here is orientated to "post a question" and get an answer within a day or two. – Mari-Lou A Nov 4 '18 at 9:29
  • There's also the deprecatory culture on SE that questions are somehow similar to the sands on the beach (one to a dozen) whereas answers are invaluable like "pearls". Well... we all see the results of that theory spread across the network, don't we? Crap depressing questions, and dwindling regular users. Sorry for the rant. – Mari-Lou A Nov 4 '18 at 9:32
  • @Mari-LouA Wait some time and get to know a site before interacting with it, I'd say. It might adjust expectations and improve interactions. The Netiquette never led to services closing down within months, because it was never mandatory. But in my opinion, some SE sites could benefit from a lower amount of daily questions. – Modus Tollens Nov 4 '18 at 9:39

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