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When I develop a website, the client almost always requires me to give them edit privileges without referring back to me, i.e. they want to edit the site's content themselves. So, in such scenarios, I always think of implementing a markdown system, just like the one used here in the Stack Exchange network. Can I build a system such that uses the same markdown techniques as used here, for example, **text** for bold, *text* for italic, etc...? If yes, do I have to mention that I copied them from here?

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    Markdown/Pagedown ( see for a reference spec also commonmark.org) is not patented AFAIK. – rene Dec 9 '18 at 19:21
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    And, indeed, the code is available on GitHub (see @rene's link above). Now, Stack Exchange doesn't quite use CommonMark, there are some subtle differences (they use MarkdownSharp), but I'd recommend going with CommonMark for new projects. – TRiG is Timothy Richard Green Dec 9 '18 at 19:47
  • Thanks, may I know why I am getting downvoted? (I don't care anyway) – Wais Kamal Dec 9 '18 at 21:04
  • @WaisKamal: It's probably from lack of research. Your question assumes that Markdown belongs to or was pioneered by Stack Exchange (which would be the only reason why they might have some say in what others do with it). But a quick glance at the Markdown Wikipedia page would tell you that neither of those is true. – Nicol Bolas Dec 9 '18 at 22:37
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Stack Exchange uses MarkdownSharp, available under the MIT license.

However, you may be better served by using CommonMark, an open standard with implementations in many languages. (It’s newer than Stack Exchange, which is why Stack Exchange doesn’t use it.)

Markdown in all its various incarnations dates back to John Gruber in 2004, and many many websites use Markdown or something similar. If you write your own Markdown or Markdown-like parser, there’s probably no need to acknowledge anyone. Still, I would recommend CommonMark: they’ve worked out a number of kinks and edge-cases, and it’s good to follow the standards.

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Can I build a system such that uses the same markdown techniques as used here ...

Sure you can!

Read on for more details about how I do so already ... Consider this markdown example:

The [Message Stack][1] appears to be a set of 3 Drupal contributed modules, that can be used in a Drupal 7 site to implement ***messaging*** in a Drupal site.

Here are some details about it (from that same link):

 > **The modules have been written with a pluggable architecture that supports customization and extensibility. Each module includes implementation examples that give a hint of the potential use cases and integration with other popular Drupal modules.**

I wonder what this is all about, ie:

1. What's the purpose of each of these modules?
2. How do its modules work together?
3. Where can I find examples of others who have been using the Message Stack already?

  [1]: https://www.drupal.org/node/2180145

The above example, is the actual "content" (= the source in markdown format) as created/edited to create the question as shown in "What is Drupal's Message Stack and how do its modules work together?". Similarly, the answer to that question (below it, on the same linked page), is yet another chunck of markdown.

Here is what it took to build such site:

  • Create a site using Drupal, a CMS, in this case version 7.
  • Download and enable 2 contributed module (free Drupal plugins), i.e.:

    • the Answers module (disclosure: I'm a co-maintainer of it).
    • the Markdown module (which provides Markdown filter integration for Drupal input formats).
  • Create the actual content (only editing/entering text in markdown format).

PS: below (between the 2 lines) is an exact copy of the above markdown sample, though this time not formatted as code (to illustrate how the rendered version of it looks like on a SE site) ...


The Message Stack appears to be a set of 3 Drupal contributed modules, that can be used in a Drupal 7 site to implement messaging in a Drupal site.

Here are some details about it (from that same link):

The modules have been written with a pluggable architecture that supports customization and extensibility. Each module includes implementation examples that give a hint of the potential use cases and integration with other popular Drupal modules.

I wonder what this is all about, ie:

  1. What's the purpose of each of these modules?
  2. How do its modules work together?
  3. Where can I find examples of others who have been using the Message Stack already?

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