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This question already has an answer here:

Can I ask a very specific question whose answer only needs "yes" or "no"?

For example, I am learning a kind of knowledge, I find that there seems to be a mistake in the book (1+1=3), and I propose my guess and deduction process. Because it is too specific, the answer may only need yes or no. The answer is simple, but the question can help others understand the process.

And if the answerer wants to make the answer useful, it may become a duplicate answer. In other words, although there are already some good answers in other questions, I still can’t fully understand.

A more specific example: After I look at the question Should I flag answers consisting only of “No” or “Yes”?, I still can't be 100% sure and want to ask my own question.

marked as duplicate by gnat, Robert Longson, Ward, Pika the Wizard of the Whales, Nathan Tuggy Jan 18 at 3:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    No. An answer is required to meet a minimum character limit. Neither Yes nor No meet that limit. – fbueckert Jan 17 at 20:06
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    Yes, you can certainly ask such a question, but there's no guarantee that it will be on topic or be received well. – Kevin B Jan 17 at 20:06
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    Ask the question as a question. Post your proposed answer as an answer. – Dan Bron Jan 17 at 20:14
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    Yes. I mean no. – Won't Jan 17 at 20:52
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Can I ask a very specific question that answers only needs "yes" and "no"?

Technically there's no way to answer just yes or no, since there's a minimum number of characters required for an answer.

Because it is too specific, the answer may only need yes or no.The answer is simple but the question can help others understand the process.

That's probably not "too specific", but rather too trivial (or too broad, because there are probably whole books and tutorials are written about that topic) to deserve an answer at all.

There's very low chance that such question would be considered helpful for future research.

And if the answerer wants to make the answer useful, it may become a duplicate answer.In other words, although there are already some good answers in other questions, I still can’t fully understand.

In such case they should have CVed the question as a duplicate in 1st place, and maybe left a comment to the specific answers given with the dupe Q&A pair.

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Yes.

 

 

OK, that would be too easy. You just did, and it's a valid Meta question. Of course, just Yes or No would not constitute an answer; a decent answer will explain why the answer is yes or no, just like this answer attempts to do.

Concrete example: one of the top 25 questions on Stack Overflow. Its first revision is a Yes/No question: Does Python have a ternary operator or not? The bonus question was added only four years later.

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Can you ask such a question? Well, technically, the system won't stop you. It wouldn't be a very good question, however. Answers can't just be, "Yes", or, "No"; they don't meet the minimum character limit.

The bigger issue is that such a question is going to be of strictly limited utility; confirming your understanding of an issue or concept isn't going to help many other people at all, so don't expect it to be received well, or even kept.

A better way to go about it is to focus on your misunderstanding of the concept. Explain what you understand, show your example, and what you expect the end result to be. By bringing the disconnect between the example result and your expected result, you can help others that run into the same problem, as answers will explain what's wrong, where the confusion lies, and how to resolve it.

That's way better than just a, "Yes" or, "No".

  • It’s weird that this most correct and useful answers is downvoted and leas useful answers are upvoted. – Dan Bron Jan 17 at 20:26
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    It uses a lot more words to say less useful things than the answer by πάντα ῥεῖ. Downvotes aren't surprising at all. – Nij Jan 17 at 20:40
  • I suppose it depends on what exchange... On SO, these questions are practically useless. Can I do something I have no idea or concept how to do? Yes, you can. Now what? Obviously, they're not asking a yes/no question, they're asking how to do it. Those questions can also be a problem as they tend to be too broad. A user should specifically state what their requirements are, what they have tried or researched and why this didn't accomplish their goals. That narrows the scope of all possible solutions significantly and keeps the gimmeh teh codez stank away, which is important for getting A's. – Won't Jan 17 at 20:56
  • i agree completely. but that's not what was asked here – Kevin B Jan 17 at 20:59
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No

  • See, just "no" is indeed possible ... even though you'll have to be a bit creative to get around the error message like "Body must be at least 30 characters; you entered 2.". If you wonder how my work-around looks like, use the edit-link to see the markup I used to make it look like only "No" ... PS: obviously, Yes would also work. Refer to Markdown Editing Help for numerous variations of this, such as using comments, as in the next comment (oeps ...) – Pierre.Vriens Jan 17 at 21:46
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    The easier way to work around the character minimum would be to post something like <!--nonononononono--> No as demonstrated here. – Pika the Wizard of the Whales Jan 17 at 21:47

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