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This question already has an answer here:

Context: How should I respond when I lied about my education and the company finds out through background check?

The most upvoted answer may be the ethically correct thing to do, but there's certainly legal ramifications with it that should not be ignored. While the answer has a bolded disclaimer that points this out, this doesn't change the fact that the content of the answer itself can cause serious harm.

Should such answers be discouraged on this site? Should they be redirected to Law.SE?

marked as duplicate by Meta Bug Wizard, Glorfindel discussion Apr 11 at 6:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • I've made the post on meta.exchange.com because I felt like this is relevant to most/all of stack exchange sites. If not, please do not hesitate to move this to workplace meta stackexchange. – l46kok Apr 5 at 0:18
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The answer's disclaimer currently reads as follows (emphasis original):

In some locations, it is a crime to provide certain types of false information to a potential employer. If this is the case where you are, or you are not sure, you should consider Eric Lippert's Answer. Otherwise read on:

Honestly, I don't see why you want to delete an answer that has a well-phrased, well-integrated, strongly-emphasized warning of its potential problems and the circumstances the warning is applicable in. What more could the answer even have to avoid leading folks to try risky things? For that matter, it would not be hard for someone to think of this on their own and try it, without necessarily being aware of the serious problems. So wouldn't it be more dangerous if any mention of this particular approach (and its dangers) was purged?

(I also find it very troubling that you're even considering deleting an answer you think "may be the ethically correct thing to do". Trying to talk someone out of doing what's right because they might suffer quite a lot would be bad enough, but outright concealing the possibility from them so they don't have an informed choice? That's messed up. Why would anyone want to censor information or arguments they believe to be correct … unless they think something else is more important than mere ethical correctness?)

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