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This (old) post about how to gain rep fast by essentially being anti-community seems like it should have been removed long ago. Why has it been allowed to stay around all these years? I'm assuming it's because the answers are legitimate, and seem to highlight ways of being a good member of this community, but if that's the case then shouldn't the question be edited heavily to remove the references to ridiculous practices which undermine Stack?

Is it just a big joke? If that's the case then it's not obvious enough to warrant not editing it.

For sure this gets found all the time and people think the community is encouraging them to answer questions fast, even at the expense of quality, and then downvote any other (better) answers just because it makes their answer look better.

Just wondering if some senior members of this community have some opinions here...

migrated from meta.stackoverflow.com Jun 19 at 5:11

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    "For sure this gets found all the time and people think the community is encouraging them to answer questions fast, even at the expense of quality" - On the contrary, obviously the post discourages behavior like that. Who would look for correct behavior in the question? – Modus Tollens Jun 19 at 4:17
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    @ModusTollens: There's a population of users of Stack Overflow/Stack Exchange sites who firmly believe that the answer is in the question, or is at least the first thing they read. While I won't presume the OP's intentions, I've been in interviews in which I've borne witness to this phenomenon. – Makoto Jun 19 at 4:18
  • @ModusTollens it’s naive to assume that everyone will read the entire post and answers and then form a well rounded opinion. People who land on this post want quick fixes, and the question provides that. – Claire Jun 19 at 4:41
  • @Claire But the question never provides fixes, how does this assumption come from? All the time questions make wrong assumptions which are corrected in answers. The cited question is no different (granted, it is using cynicism, but it's using it to make a point). – Modus Tollens Jun 19 at 4:45
  • @Claire Lots of FAQ posts are done like this, eg meta.stackoverflow.com/q/254428/1288408. "Can I do this?" - "No" – Modus Tollens Jun 19 at 4:49
  • @ModusTollens The question is a reference to a post found elsewhere on the internet. The "tips" given are actual tips, the OP is just pitching them to the Stack community. If you think people are not landing on this post, reading the 6 items, and forming ideas, you're crazy. – Claire Jun 19 at 4:55
  • @Claire The OP is Jeff Atwood (co-founder of SO). He knew the answer when posting the question. Thanks for calling me crazy, btw. That was sarcasm. – Modus Tollens Jun 19 at 4:59
  • @ModusTollens Right well my ignorance here is a perfect example of why this post doesn’t belong on the site. It doesn’t matter what awesome ideas are in the answers. The fact that the question exists means more people who are looking for these ideas can find them. It’s less of a question and more of a “share”. – Claire Jun 19 at 5:05
  • @Claire I don't believe many users to misunderstand the question or to not look at at least the top answer. If that proves to be wrong, we might add a flashing "answers are in the answer section" banner to the site. At that time I'd resign from SO in cheerful resignation :) Anyway, I'm off to work. – Modus Tollens Jun 19 at 5:10
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    I wonder how long it takes before the wonderful art of sarcasm is completely dead because noone gets it anymore. And what will happen to the last people who do manage to see it? Will we be outcasts? Condemned to live in a boring world where everything is always taken literally? – ivarni Jun 19 at 5:42
  • I think Cody Gray sums it up nicely in a comment: "I think you're missing the tongue-in-cheek nature of this question and its answers..." – Peter Mortensen Jun 20 at 3:45
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Well, in this specific situation - the locking reflects that the post has historic significance but no longer reflects how we do things. Being locked, its unlikely anyone's taken a good look at it lately, since it can't be bumped.

As such, no one's seen it since Jeff locked it in 2017, and while Jeff's had a great influence on the site in the early days (as the CEO for the first couple of years, and a pretty active user), he doesn't have a direct influence on site policy, and his views don't really reflect SE (the network) or SO policy these days.

If we do keep the post - it's an example of youthful silliness (and many,if not all of us, have done silly things).

Stuff like that is tricky. We need to balance between having people find things that are relevant to the current norms and culture of the site, and the risk of erasing/losing our history, cause this was the sort of thing we did once.

The historical lock is a reasonable compromise that lets us keep our historical posts, while letting people know this isn't how we do things anymore. The latter is just as important. We might end up reviewing that (either us volunteer mods, or a passing community manager) and choosing to delete it, but at least for now, this kinda works for us.

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I'm of the impression that the cynicism in the actual question itself is being drowned out by either angst or frustration in this present day and age.

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    Well as a user who does not have the luxury of accruing years of rep from questions like What is the CSS parent selector? or How do I redirect a webpage? I can say yes, it’s very frustrating to see stuff like this and experience it – Claire Jun 19 at 4:46
  • I think Cody Gray sums it up nicely in a comment: "I think you're missing the tongue-in-cheek nature of this question and its answers..." – Peter Mortensen Jun 20 at 3:45
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No, that question is not a joke. It was a valid question back when it was posted, and it's being kept because it has a useful answer that is still very legit and relevant these days.

Screenshot of the answer in case the question gets deleted at some point:

Some of those tips might not be great, but others are really good, and not trivial at all.

I do agree most comments and other answers are jokes, and won't be bothered if they're removed.

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    I think Cody Gray sums it up nicely in a comment: "I think you're missing the tongue-in-cheek nature of this question and its answers..." – Peter Mortensen Jun 20 at 3:46

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